News In Brief Head and neck cancer outcomes associated with race may be linked more closely to socio-economic and behavioral factors than to genetic differences related to race. Henry Ford Hospital researchers found self-reported African Americans to be at greater risk for late-stage cancer. Researchers examined the diagnosis and overall survival of ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   November 01, 2010
News In Brief
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Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   November 01, 2010
News In Brief
The ASHA Leader, November 2010, Vol. 15, 3. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.15142010.3
The ASHA Leader, November 2010, Vol. 15, 3. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.15142010.3
Head and Neck Cancer Outcomes
Head and neck cancer outcomes associated with race may be linked more closely to socio-economic and behavioral factors than to genetic differences related to race. Henry Ford Hospital researchers found self-reported African Americans to be at greater risk for late-stage cancer. Researchers examined the diagnosis and overall survival of 358 patients, 37% of whom were African American; using genetic West African ancestry information markers, they found no correlation between the genetic ancestry and cancer survival. The results were presented at the American Academy of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery Foundation annual meeting in September.
The Genetics of ADHD
Researchers have found evidence that attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a genetic condition in which small DNA segments are duplicated or missing. Researchers analyzed the genomes of 366 children diagnosed with ADHD and 1,000 controls. Rare copy number variants were almost twice as common in children with ADHD compared to the control sample and even higher for children with learning disabilities. Search “ADHD genetics” at The Lancet’s website.
Post-Stroke Brain Recovery
Brain cells of recovering stroke patients can take on new roles. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure brain activity, researchers examined 26 stroke patients before and after the patients received 30 hours of speech-language treatment. The healthy areas of the brain surrounding the damaged areas became more “plastic” and more able to take over functions of the damaged cells. Search “Fridriksson” at The Journal of Neuroscience’s website.
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November 2010
Volume 15, Issue 14