Adolescent Treatment: Research and Resources Adolescents entering residential programs should be screened for possible language impairment (LI), according to a study in Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools. Undiagnosed LI for youth in residential care is a concern, as similar populations show increased risk of language delays. Researchers assessed the risk for ... Research in Brief
Free
Research in Brief  |   December 01, 2010
Adolescent Treatment: Research and Resources
Author Notes
Article Information
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / School-Based Settings / Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Social Communication & Pragmatics Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   December 01, 2010
Adolescent Treatment: Research and Resources
The ASHA Leader, December 2010, Vol. 15, 16-17. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB.15152010.16
The ASHA Leader, December 2010, Vol. 15, 16-17. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB.15152010.16
Adolescent Treatment: Research
Language Impairment and Residential Care
Adolescents entering residential programs should be screened for possible language impairment (LI), according to a study in Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools. Undiagnosed LI for youth in residential care is a concern, as similar populations show increased risk of language delays. Researchers assessed the risk for LI of 80 youngsters (30 girls and 50 boys, average age 15.68) entering a residential group care program. Thirty-four percent of the youth were identified as having a special education disability diagnosis; none, however, had been previously identified as having a speech or language impairment.
Researchers underscore four findings: (1) More than half of the sample (54%) were identified as being at risk for LI, suggesting that language screenings at admission to residential care may be necessary to identify youth who are in need of further language assessment; (2) youth who were at risk for LI presented greater academic achievement deficits and functional academic risks than their peers who were not at risk, suggesting that these students may require language services to improve their academic functioning; (3) speech-language pathologists should be essential staff members in residential care facilities; (4) programming in residential care should consider accelerating the identification of possible LI for these youth to ensure that the necessary supports are addressed while they are in care. Search DOI: 10.1044/0161-1461(2009/08-0089).
ASD and Loneliness
Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) may have poor peer relationships despite age and ability, and as they enter adolescence, social problems typically worsen and feelings of loneliness and isolation may emerge. Although inclusion in regular classrooms may allow adolescents with high-functioning ASD to be involved in the social structure of their classroom, they remain more isolated or peripheral in those classrooms, according to a study in the Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs. Researchers examined the social–emotional relationships of adolescents with ASD and their typically developing (TD) classmates.
Participants included 20 adolescents (seven with ASD and 13 TD classmates) enrolled in a drama class at a general education high school. The adolescents with ASD experienced significantly more loneliness, had significantly poorer friendship quality in companionship and helpfulness, and had significantly lower social network status than their TD classmates. In addition, 92.4% of TD adolescents were significantly connected and recognized in their classroom social structure; in contrast, 71.4% of the adolescents with ASD were either isolated or uninvolved in their classrooms. These results suggest that more intensive social skills interventions that focus on friendship development may be needed for adolescents with ASD. Search DOI: 10.1111/j.1471-3802.2010.01148.x.
Cochlear Implants and Actor Vocal Training
Actor vocal training may benefit young people with hearing loss, both in the way in which they use their voices and in the way in which they view themselves, according to a University of Melbourne (Australia) study. Researchers examined changes to speech production in adolescents with hearing loss and changes to psychosocial factors (e.g., confidence, self-esteem, and anxiety) following a period of actor vocal training. Study participants were cochlear implant users with a mean age of 15.9 years; approximately half wore a hearing aid in the contralateral ear. The mean age at implantation was 7.6 years; participants displayed a range of speech production abilities. Perceptual and acoustic analyses post-training indicated significant changes to vocal parameters, including increased pitch range and variability and decreased speaking rate. In addition, post-training stress levels were significantly lowered. The study appears in the Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education. Search DOI 10.1093/deafed/enq033.
Neurological Connectivity and ASD
Adolescents with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) show weaker connectivity in the “default network"—the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), retrosplenial cortex, lateral parietal cortex/angular gyrus, medial prefrontal cortex, superior frontal gyrus, temporal lobe, and parahippocampal gyrus—than previously reported in adults with ASD, according to a study by University of Michigan researchers. ASD is associated with disturbances of neural connectivity; this study examined the connectivity in the default network in 16 adolescents with ASD and 15 controls.
Relative to controls, adolescents with ASD showed widespread weaker connectivity in nine of the 11 areas of the default network; an analysis of symptom severity indicated that poorer social skills and increases in restricted and repetitive behaviors and interests correlated with weaker connectivity, whereas poorer verbal and non-verbal communication correlated with stronger connectivity in multiple areas of the default network. The findings also show that weaker connectivity within the default network is associated with specific impairments in ASD. The study appears in Brain Research (search “Shih-Jen Weng”).
Adolescent Treatment: Resources
ASHA’s webpage on working with adolescents includes links to a variety of materials on topics including assessment, service delivery models, developmental milestones, literacy, fluency, and pragmatics.
Practice Policy Documents
Roles and Responsibilities of Speech-Language Pathologists With Respect to Reading and Writing in Children and Adolescents: Position Statement and Guidelines
Knowledge and Skills Needed by Speech-Language Pathologists With Respect to Reading and Writing in Children and Adolescents
Adolescent Literacy and Older Students with Learning Disabilities (National Joint Committee on Learning Disabilities)
Service Delivery Models
“Service Delivery Models for Adolescents With Language Disorders” (Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools [LSHSS], January 1993)
“Response to Intervention: SLPs as Linchpins in Secondary Schools” (The ASHA Leader, April 5, 2009)
“Adolescent Language Programs” (LSHSS, January 1993)
“SLPs in Secondary Schools: Going Beyond Survival to ‘Thrival’” (ASHA Leader, May 8, 2007)
Assessment
“Language Assessment in Adolescents: Addressing Critical Issues” (LSHSS, January 1993)
“Developmental Markers in Adolescent Language: Syntax, Semantics, and Pragmatics” (LSHSS, January 1993)
Fluency Therapy
“Helping Adolescents Who Stutter Focus on Fluency” (LSHSS, April 1995)
Language Development
“Infusing Language Enhancement Into Reading Curriculum for Disadvantaged Adolescents” (LSHSS, April 1997)
Speech and Language Skills in Children and Adolescents with Down Syndrome (National Down Syndrome Society)
Pragmatics and Executive Functioning
“Importance of Selected Communication Skills for Talking With Peers and Teachers: Adolescents’ Opinions” (LSHSS, January 1999)
“When ‘Emily Dickinson’ Met ‘Steven Spielberg’: Assessing Social Information Processing in Literacy Contexts” (LSHSS, July 1999)
“Social Fitness for Students with Asperger’s Syndrome” (ASHA Leader, Dec. 26, 2007)
“Pragmatic Communication Disorders: New Intervention Approaches” (ASHA Leader, Sept. 4, 2007)
“Management of Sports-Related Concussion in Children and Adolescents” (ASHA Leader, July 14, 2009)
“What Are Executive Functions and Self-Regulation and What Do They Have To Do With Language-Learning Disorders?” (LSHSS, July 1999)
Literacy Skills
“Assessment and Intervention in Overcoming Writing Difficulties: An Illustration From the Self-Regulated Strategy Development Model” (LSHSS, July 1999)
Motivating Adolescents
“Second Chances: Improving Decoding Skills in the Older Student” (LSHSS, July 1999)
“Adolescent Pragmatic Skills: A Comparison of Latino Students in English as a Second Language and Speech and Language Programs” (LSHSS, January 1996)
0 Comments
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment
Name
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account ×
FROM THIS ISSUE
December 2010
Volume 15, Issue 15