News In Brief Language skills appear to be more important for boys than girls in developing self-control and succeeding in school. Researchers examined data on 120 children as they aged from 1 to 3 years to test the impact of two expressive language skills—spoken vocabulary and talkativeness—on the growth of toddlers’ self-regulation. ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   December 01, 2010
News In Brief
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Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   December 01, 2010
News In Brief
The ASHA Leader, December 2010, Vol. 15, 3. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB2.15152010.3
The ASHA Leader, December 2010, Vol. 15, 3. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB2.15152010.3
Boy Talk
Language skills appear to be more important for boys than girls in developing self-control and succeeding in school. Researchers examined data on 120 children as they aged from 1 to 3 years to test the impact of two expressive language skills—spoken vocabulary and talkativeness—on the growth of toddlers’ self-regulation. Language skills helped the children regulate emotions and behavior; boys lagged behind in both self-regulation and language skills; and vocabulary was a better predictor of self-regulation than talkativeness. See the abstract online.
Diagnosing Autism by MRI
Researchers are honing in on a diagnostic tool to identify autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Using MRI and fMRI, researchers have identified “hot spots” where the left and right hemispheres of the brains of people with ASD do not communicate properly with one another. Other than an increased brain size in young children with ASD, these hot spots are the only other difference researchers have found. Visit Physorg.com for more information.
Damaged Brains Retain Memory
A new study in the Journal of Neuroscience (Oct. 13) shows that when the hippocampus is damaged, the functions of working memory (the ability to hold small amounts of information in an active, readily available state) remain intact—but with limits. Four patients with memory impairment and hippocampus damage studied an arrangement of objects and then reproduced the arrangement. When the number of objects was limited to three, the patients’ ability to recall was similar to that of control subjects.
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December 2010
Volume 15, Issue 15