Audiology in Brief Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) in Boston has completed the first successful trial of a medicine to reverse hearing loss and reduce tumor volume in some patients with neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2), according to the New England Journal of Medicine (July 23, Vol. 361, No. 4). Lead researcher Scott Plotkin, ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   November 01, 2009
Audiology in Brief
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Hearing Disorders / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   November 01, 2009
Audiology in Brief
The ASHA Leader, November 2009, Vol. 14, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.14152009.5
The ASHA Leader, November 2009, Vol. 14, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.14152009.5
Cancer Drug Helps NF2 Patients
Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) in Boston has completed the first successful trial of a medicine to reverse hearing loss and reduce tumor volume in some patients with neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2), according to the New England Journal of Medicine (July 23, Vol. 361, No. 4). Lead researcher Scott Plotkin, an MGH neuro-oncologist, sought a medical option for his NF2 patients with acoustic neuromas. Not only do tumors threaten hearing loss, but current therapies, including surgery and localized radiation, also pose a risk. Before treatment, the 10 trial patients experienced a median annual tumor volumetric growth rate of 62%. Bevacizumab (marketed as Avastin), a medication sometimes used to treat advanced cancers, shrunk tumors 20% or more in six patients, a rate maintained during up to 16 months of follow-up. Three patients were not eligible for a hearing response; of the remaining seven patients, hearing improved in four, stabilized in two, and progressed in one. There were no serious side effects. NF2 tumors appear to have a blood supply fueled by vascular endothelial growth factor, a signaling protein involved with blood vessel formation. Avastin is one of several drugs that block production of the protein, apparently shrinking the tumor as a result. Visit the New England Journal of Medicine.
Day Care Noise Affects Vocal Quality
Noisy day care may have an effect on children’s vocal quality, according to a recent study in the Journal of Voice (Sept. 2009, Vol. 23, Issue 5). Ten children at three day care centers in Sweden with no hearing or speech problems were equipped with microphones and portable digital audiotape equipment, which were used to make three daily recordings. The mean background noise at the three centers was 82.6 dBALeq, ranging from 81.5 to 83.6 dBALeq. Lunchtime noise levels reached 85.4 dBALeq at one facility. Perceptual evaluation of children’s voices at the day care center with the highest noise showed higher scores on hoarseness, breathiness, and hyperfunction. Girls increased their loudness levels during the day, although boys did not. Visit Journal of Voice.
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November 2009
Volume 14, Issue 15