Audiology in Brief Children with cochlear implants (CIs) rate their quality of life as highly as children with normal hearing, according to one of the first studies that looked at children and their parents. The research is published in the Feb. 1 issue of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery. Eighty-eight families were divided ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   April 01, 2010
Audiology in Brief
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Hearing Disorders / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   April 01, 2010
Audiology in Brief
The ASHA Leader, April 2010, Vol. 15, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.15042010.5
The ASHA Leader, April 2010, Vol. 15, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.15042010.5
Quality of Life for Kids With CIs
Children with cochlear implants (CIs) rate their quality of life as highly as children with normal hearing, according to one of the first studies that looked at children and their parents. The research is published in the Feb. 1 issue of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery.
Eighty-eight families were divided into two groups by age of implantation: 8- to 11-year-olds and 12- to 16-year-olds. The children were asked how they felt about themselves, their family lives, their friends, and school; responses were compared to same-age children with normal hearing. Parents were questioned separately.
CI users in both groups scored similarly to their parents and peers with normal hearing. Younger CI users scored their family lives lower compared with their normal-hearing peers. Teen CI users scored their school lives lower compared with their parents’ scores of the teens’ school life. Among CI participants, earlier implantation and longer CI use resulted in higher quality-of-life scores. For more information, visit Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery online.
Tinnitus Not Highly Inherited
Tinnitus does not appear to be a highly inherited condition, according to the February issue of Archives of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery. In the first large population-based family study, researchers used self-report questionnaire data that included information on first-degree family relationships and used mathematical models to estimate the relative contribution of genes and environmental effects.
The researchers analyzed data collected from 12,940 spouses, 27,607 parents and offspring, and 11,498 siblings. A subgroup of 16,186 individuals with hearing loss and 17,785 controls were asked about tinnitus, and 28,066 responded. About 21% of participants reported definite or probable symptoms of tinnitus. Correlations for tinnitus ranged from 0.01 to 0.07 for parents and offspring. The correlation between siblings ranged from 0.06 to 0.14 and the spouse correlation was 0.04. for more visit the Archives of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgeryonline.
Painkillers and Hearing Loss
Researchers say there may be a link between the regular use of everyday painkillers and hearing loss, particularly in younger men.
In a study of 26,917 men, those who used over-the-counter analgesics twice a week or more were 16%–99% more likely to report a hearing loss. Multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios of the association between painkiller use and hearing loss in men were 1.12 for aspirin, 1.21 for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and 1.22 for acetaminophen. For those who used NSAIDs, the risk increased with a longer duration of regular use.
The magnitude of association was substantially higher in younger men. Men younger than 60 had a hazard ratio for hearing loss of 1.33 for aspirin use, 1.61 for NSAIDs, and 1.99 for acetaminophen. The impact of regular use of multiple analgesics appeared to be additive, raising the possibility that different types of analgesics may impair auditory function through different mechanisms.
The study did not account for factors such as noise exposure or the reason for analgesic use. Read the public access article in the March 2010 issue of the American Journal of Medicine.
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April 2010
Volume 15, Issue 4