Mary (Reinoldi) Zenk When I was in elementary school, my older sister, Mary, was studying to be an audiologist at Mt. St. Agnes College. She was passionate about her area of study and would tell me in great detail about the children she worked with in the clinic. I loved hearing her stories ... Golden Apple
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Golden Apple  |   April 01, 2010
Mary (Reinoldi) Zenk
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Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / School-Based Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Golden Apple
Golden Apple   |   April 01, 2010
Mary (Reinoldi) Zenk
The ASHA Leader, April 2010, Vol. 15, 39. doi:10.1044/leader.GA1.15052010.39
The ASHA Leader, April 2010, Vol. 15, 39. doi:10.1044/leader.GA1.15052010.39

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When I was in elementary school, my older sister, Mary, was studying to be an audiologist at Mt. St. Agnes College. She was passionate about her area of study and would tell me in great detail about the children she worked with in the clinic. I loved hearing her stories because the endings always seemed happy—children who came in with communication problems were treated and shortly thereafter, their problems were gone.
Years later as a sophomore in college, I was struggling to choose a major. Although many areas appealed to me I couldn’t settle on one. I casually mentioned this to Mary, and, like a good big sister, she reminded me of my former interest in the clinic. She told me what a great field audiology was for her. She had gone on to get her master’s at the University of Wisconsin and encouraged me to take another look at either speech-language pathology or audiology. At first I resisted her advice, thinking I couldn’t go into the same field. But she persisted until I finally agreed to investigate the major. After that, it didn’t take long to realize what I wanted to do. I went on to major in speech-language pathology and have been a practicing SLP for 30 years.
Sadly, my sister passed away from breast cancer in 1991 at the age of 43. I continue to be grateful for her wisdom, love, and guidance. Through my work I honor her dedication to this field, one that brought both of us so much joy and satisfaction.
Jane Martello
Clarksville, Md.
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April 2010
Volume 15, Issue 5