Pediatric Practice: New Research and Online Resources Connected speech intelligibility of children with hearing loss should be assessed directly and not with articulation tests. In a recent Purdue University study, 44 children (ages 2–15) with hearing loss produced words from the Goldman-Fristoe Test of Articulation-2 and also produced sets of 10 short sentences to determine whether ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   June 01, 2010
Pediatric Practice: New Research and Online Resources
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Hearing Disorders / Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Early Identification & Intervention / Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   June 01, 2010
Pediatric Practice: New Research and Online Resources
The ASHA Leader, June 2010, Vol. 15, 20-21. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB.15072010.20
The ASHA Leader, June 2010, Vol. 15, 20-21. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB.15072010.20
Direct Assessment for Articulation
Connected speech intelligibility of children with hearing loss should be assessed directly and not with articulation tests. In a recent Purdue University study, 44 children (ages 2–15) with hearing loss produced words from the Goldman-Fristoe Test of Articulation-2 and also produced sets of 10 short sentences to determine whether the articulation test scores would be closely associated with speech intelligibility.
Correlation analyses were conducted between scores for seven word-based predictor variables and percent-intelligible scores derived from listener judgments of stimulus sentences. Six of seven predictor variables were significantly correlated with percent-intelligible scores. However, no single predictor variable or multi-variable model accounted for more than 25% of the variability in intelligibility scores.
These findings confirm the importance of assessing connected speech intelligibility directly. The study appears in “Papers in Press” of the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research (search “word articulation scores”).
Early TV Exposure Lowers Child’s Well-being
According to a study published in the May 4 issue of the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, preschool children who experience excessive television exposure may attain lower levels of overall well-being later in childhood. Researchers collected data from 1,314 children and parent reports of weekly hours of television at 29 and 53 months of age. For each additional hour of television exposure at 29 months old, researchers found that a 10-year-old child had 7% and 6% unit decreases in classroom engagement and math achievement, respectively; a 10% unit increase in victimization by classmates; a 13% unit decrease in time spent doing weekend physical activity; and a 9% unit decrease in pursuing activities involving physical effort. These children also were 9% to 10% more likely to consume soft drinks and unhealthy snacks and had a 5% increase in body mass index.
Brain Differences in Fragile X
The brains of young children with Fragile X syndrome (the most common known cause of inherited intellectual disability and autism) are anatomically different from the brains of children without the condition. Researchers from Stanford University School of Medicine and the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill used high-resolution MRI to obtain detailed brain images of 69 boys from 1 to 3 years of age, including 21 with Fragile X syndrome, 41 without, and seven with developmental delays not related to Fragile X. The children were followed up two years later with another imaging session.
The results demonstrated that although the children with Fragile X had similar brain scans during the first imaging session, they developed an overabundance of gray matter in the caudate and thalamus regions of the brain and the vermis part of the cerebellum showed diminished gray matter at the second imaging session. For more information, visit Stanford University’s Web site.
Unilateral Hearing Loss Affects Language Ability
By the time they reach school age, one in 20 children has hearing loss in one ear that may raise significant hurdles, according to a new study at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Researchers found on average, children with hearing loss in one ear have poorer oral language scores than children with hearing in both ears.
Hearing loss in one ear can stem from congenital abnormalities in the ear, head trauma, or infections. The condition, which may go undetected, may be mistaken for the child’s lack of attention or selective hearing; even children with recognized monaural hearing loss often aren’t fitted with hearing aids and often don’t receive accommodations, researchers say.The researchers studied 74 six- to 12-year-old children with hearing loss in one ear. Each was matched with a sibling with normal hearing to minimize the possible effects of environmental and genetic factors on the children’s language skills.
The children were tested with the Oral and Written Language Scales (OWLS), a widely used tool to assess language comprehension and expression. An average OWLS score is 100; hearing loss in one ear caused about a 10-point drop in scores. The strongest effect from hearing loss in one ear was found in children living below the poverty level or with mothers who have little education.
The researchers say that the study results should raise awareness among parents, educators, and pediatricians who assume that having hearing in one ear means children won’t need additional assistance. The study, funded by the National Institutes of Health, appears in the June issue of Pediatrics.
Resources at www.asha.org
Feeding and Swallowing
  • Guidelines for SLPs Performing Videofluoroscopic Swallowing Studies

  • Guidelines for SLPs Providing Swallowing and Feeding Services in Schools

  • Knowledge and Skills for Speech-Language Pathologists Performing Endoscopic Assessment of Swallowing Functions

  • Knowledge and Skills Needed by Speech-Language Pathologists Providing Services to Individuals With Swallowing and/or Feeding Disorders

  • Preferred Practice Patterns for the Profession of Speech-Language Pathology: Swallowing and Feeding Assessment—Children; Swallowing and Feeding Intervention—Children

  • Roles of Speech-Language Pathologists in Swallowing and Feeding Disorders: Position Statement and Technical Report

Continuing Education
Course topics include evaluation of pediatric feeding and swallowing disorders, working with children with dysphagia in schools, psychosocial issues, and instrumental assessment.
Related Resources
EHDI
  • Guidelines for the Audiologic Assessment of Children From Birth to 5 Years of Age

  • Guidelines for Audiologists Providing Informational and Adjustment Counseling to Families of Infants and Young Children With Hearing Loss Birth to 5 Years of Age

  • Guidelines for Audiologic Screening

  • Joint Committee on Infant Hearing (JCIH)СJCIH Year 2007 Position Statement: Principles and Guidelines for Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Programs

  • Loss to Follow-Up in Early Hearing Detection and InterventionСTechnical Report

  • Natural Environments for Infants and Toddlers Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing and Their Families: Fact Sheet

  • Preferred Practice Patterns for the Profession of Audiology

  • Roles, Knowledge, and Skills: Audiologists Providing Clinical Services to Infants and Young Children Birth to 5 Years of Age

  • Roles and Responsibilities of Speech-Language Pathologists in Early Intervention: Position Statement

  • The Use of FM Amplification Instruments for Infants and Preschool Children With Hearing Impairment: Position Statement

Related Resources
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June 2010
Volume 15, Issue 7