News In Brief Parents of a young child with autism have the same divorce rate as all couples, but a study in the August 2010 issue of the Journal of Family Psychology shows that couples parenting an adolescent or adult with autism are more likely to divorce than couples with typically developing ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   September 01, 2010
News In Brief
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Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / School-Based Settings / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   September 01, 2010
News In Brief
The ASHA Leader, September 2010, Vol. 15, 3. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB2.15112010.3
The ASHA Leader, September 2010, Vol. 15, 3. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB2.15112010.3
Autism and Marriage
Parents of a young child with autism have the same divorce rate as all couples, but a study in the August 2010 issue of the Journal of Family Psychology shows that couples parenting an adolescent or adult with autism are more likely to divorce than couples with typically developing older children. The study compared 391 couples whose adolescent or grown children had autism with a sample from the National Survey of Midlife in the United States. After a child reaches age 8, the divorce rate decreased for parents of typically developing children but remained high for parents of children with autism. Search “autism marriage” at the University of Wisconsin’s website.
New Special Education Appointments
Sue Swenson, former executive director of the nonprofit Arc of the United States and commissioner of the Administration on Developmental Disabilities, has been appointed deputy assistant secretary of the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services. Melody Musgrove, director of business development with LRP Publications and former Mississippi state director of special education, is the new director of the Office of Special Education Programs.
Script Training for Apraxia
Script training may be successful and functional for clients with apraxia of speech, according to new research in Papers in Press of the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology. In the study, three individuals successfully acquired scripts and demonstrated script retention six months post-treatment. Clients reported increased confidence, speaking ease, and speech naturalness. Because principles of motor learning were included in the script training, future research is needed to determine its role in long-term script retention.
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September 2010
Volume 15, Issue 11