Audiology in Brief The International Code Council (ICC) rejected proposed classroom acoustics standards during its May 17 meeting in Dallas. The next opportunity to submit the classroom acoustics standard will be in 2013. The revised American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/Acoustical Society of America (ASA) standards S12.60 2010 called for the international building ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   July 01, 2010
Audiology in Brief
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Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   July 01, 2010
Audiology in Brief
The ASHA Leader, July 2010, Vol. 15, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.15082010.5
The ASHA Leader, July 2010, Vol. 15, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.15082010.5
Classroom Acoustics Standards Rejected
The International Code Council (ICC) rejected proposed classroom acoustics standards during its May 17 meeting in Dallas. The next opportunity to submit the classroom acoustics standard will be in 2013. The revised American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/Acoustical Society of America (ASA) standards S12.60 2010 called for the international building code to meet the ANSI classroom acoustics standard for new construction.
ASHA member Peggy Nelson, associate professor at the University of Minnesota and a member of the ASA/ANSI standard working group, provided comments to the ICC about the science behind the need for the classroom acoustics standard; Tori Gustafson, associate professor at Texas Tech University, provided comments on behalf of ASHA. Download the ANSI/ASA S12.60 standards online. Watch for more detailed coverage of this topic in the Aug. 3 issue.
New Mexico Requires 45-Day Hearing Aid Trial
New state regulations in New Mexico require a 45-day trial period for purchasers of hearing aids. The new rules, adopted in April by the Speech-Language Pathology, Audiology and Hearing Aid Dispensing Practices Board, were promoted by the Hearing Loss Association of Albuquerque.
Under the new rules, which took effect June 1, audiologists must give consumers a 45-day trial period after fitting new or used hearing aids. The hearing aids may be returned for a full refund at any time during the trial period, less a nominal agreed-to fee. Sellers also must refund the cost of the hearing aids within 30 days after they are returned. For more information, visit The Santa Fe New Mexican online.
Redefining Rootlet’s Role
Researchers at the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders are still refining the details of how humans hear and have discovered that a structure at the base of the stereocilium is critical to the hearing process. The structure, called the rootlet, is a short connector piece between a stereocilium and a hair cell, extending a short distance into each structure like a toothpick that connects two pieces of food.
“Just like stereocilia, the rootlet consists of the protein actin, but it’s a denser structure than the stereocilium. Nobody knows precisely what it is made of and what its function is,” said geneticist Thomas Friedman, a study senior researcher.
A series of studies conducted by Friedman’s research team found that mutations in a gene called TRIOBP are associated with a type of hereditary deafness in humans called DFNB28. The team discovered that not only is the protein TRIOBP critical for the formation of the rootlet, but stereocilia that lack rootlets will not be able to function properly and will degenerate. The researchers propose that TRIOBP forms a rootlet by winding itself very tightly around the stereocilia’s actin filaments that insert into the hair cell. The rootlet gives the stereocilia greater rigidity and durability yet flexibility, which is required for the stereocilia to function properly. For an abstract, visit the May 28 issue of Cell.
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July 2010
Volume 15, Issue 8