Parents of Children With ASD Generally Support Video-Game Play Parents of children with autism spectrum disorder mostly approve of video-game play, especially if it appears to help symptoms, finds new research in the journal Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools. Led by Erinn H. Finke at Pennsylvania State University, the study analyzed online surveys completed by parents of ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   May 01, 2015
Parents of Children With ASD Generally Support Video-Game Play
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Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   May 01, 2015
Parents of Children With ASD Generally Support Video-Game Play
The ASHA Leader, May 2015, Vol. 20, 12. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB1.20052015.12
The ASHA Leader, May 2015, Vol. 20, 12. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB1.20052015.12
Parents of children with autism spectrum disorder mostly approve of video-game play, especially if it appears to help symptoms, finds new research in the journal Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools.
Led by Erinn H. Finke at Pennsylvania State University, the study analyzed online surveys completed by parents of 152 children ages 8 to 12 to determine attitudes toward video-game play and whether those attitudes vary based on the severity of a child’s ASD symptoms.
Although the overall effect of video games on children and teens is part of a larger, more complex debate, parents of children with ASD had positive attitudes about video games, regardless of the time spent on, the type of or the intensity of the games played. The ASD symptom severity appeared unrelated to the parents’ attitudes, and they were especially supportive if they believed the video games were positively influencing their child’s development.

With parents approving, video games could be used to supplement speech-language intervention in schools.

Parents completing the survey listed up to five of their child’s favorite, most frequently played video games. Out of 602 titles reported, the top five were some version of a Mario game, some version of a LEGO game, Angry Birds, Pokemon and Minecraft. Other frequently played games included Call of Duty, Plants vs. Zombies, Skylanders, Sonic and Wii Sports.
With data showing that parents could be approving, the researchers suggest video games could be used to supplement speech-language intervention in schools. Previous research shows certain games can be used to motivate children with ASD in a variety of ways, and can hold educational value on their own.
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May 2015
Volume 20, Issue 5