Australian Groups Battle Noise-Induced Hearing Loss HEARsmart, a new initiative by the Australian HEARing Cooperative Research Centre, has developed two efforts to promote smarter hearing habits and reduce the incidence of acquired hearing loss. The first is a new online noise risk calculator, developed by the National Acoustic Laboratories, the research division of Australian Hearing. It ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   May 01, 2015
Australian Groups Battle Noise-Induced Hearing Loss
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Hearing Disorders / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   May 01, 2015
Australian Groups Battle Noise-Induced Hearing Loss
The ASHA Leader, May 2015, Vol. 20, 10. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB3.20052015.10
The ASHA Leader, May 2015, Vol. 20, 10. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB3.20052015.10
HEARsmart, a new initiative by the Australian HEARing Cooperative Research Centre, has developed two efforts to promote smarter hearing habits and reduce the incidence of acquired hearing loss.
The first is a new online noise risk calculator, developed by the National Acoustic Laboratories, the research division of Australian Hearing. It targets young Australians who want to know if their listening habits—such as going to nightclubs or concerts or using personal music devices—are dangerous.
The website offers a quick online survey that calculates noise-exposure risk based on lifestyle habits, and suggests ways to manage these risks.
The second program is a pilot study that will help to determine how live music venues in Australia can be more “hearing friendly.”
HEARing CRC researchers will work with Music Victoria—a leading body for contemporary music—and live music venue owners to measure noise levels at gigs and gather input from patrons and performers on their experiences. After data analysis to identify main noise-exposure risks, HEARsmart will develop a practical noise-reduction package.
The package is likely to include recommendations on venue modifications to reduce reverberation; providing quieter, chill-out spaces for patrons to take a break; or working with sound engineers to produce sound at a safer, but still enjoyable, level.
The pilot study is funded by the Deafness Foundation Victoria and supported by Music Victoria, NAL, The Deafness Forum Australia and Vicdeaf.
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May 2015
Volume 20, Issue 5