Board of Ethics Decisions The ASHA Board of Ethics has found four speech-language pathologists in violation of the Association’s Code of Ethics. Three cases involved violations of the 2010 Code of Ethics. By misrepresenting therapy time to include transitions and documentation time; being sanctioned by the North Carolina Board of Examiners for Speech-Language Pathologists ... ASHA News
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ASHA News  |   May 01, 2015
Board of Ethics Decisions
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Professional Issues & Training / ASHA News
ASHA News   |   May 01, 2015
Board of Ethics Decisions
The ASHA Leader, May 2015, Vol. 20, 56-57. doi:10.1044/leader.AN4.20052015.56
The ASHA Leader, May 2015, Vol. 20, 56-57. doi:10.1044/leader.AN4.20052015.56
The ASHA Board of Ethics has found four speech-language pathologists in violation of the Association’s Code of Ethics.
Three cases involved violations of the 2010 Code of Ethics.
By misrepresenting therapy time to include transitions and documentation time; being sanctioned by the North Carolina Board of Examiners for Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists for false recordkeeping; and recording for services that exceeded the actual amounts of time that services were rendered while employed as a school-based SLP, Valerie Jeanne Jaecksch of Charlotte, North Carolina, violated the following:
Principle of Ethics I: Individuals shall honor their responsibility to hold paramount the welfare of persons they serve professionally or who are participants in research and scholarly activities, and they shall treat animals involved in research in a humane manner.
Principle I, Rule O: Individuals shall not charge for services not rendered, nor shall they misrepresent services rendered, products dispensed, or research and scholarly activities conducted.
Principle III: Individuals shall honor their responsibility to the public by promoting public understanding of the professions, by supporting the development of services designed to fulfill the unmet needs of the public, and by providing accurate information in all communications involving any aspect of the professions, including the dissemination of research findings and scholarly activities, and the promotion, marketing, and advertising of products and services.
Principle III, Rule E: Individuals shall not defraud or engage in any scheme to defraud in connection with obtaining payment, reimbursement, or grants for services rendered, research conducted, or products dispensed.
The sanction is suspension of membership and certification for 12 months, effective retroactive from June 1, 2014.
By discontinuing service to those she was serving without appropriate authorization, forging parents’ and school-based professionals’ signatures, and changing student file contents, Peggy Riley of Manhattan, Kansas, violated the following:
Principle I (see above).
Principle I, Rule R: Individuals shall not discontinue service to those they are serving without providing reasonable notice.
Principle IV: Individuals shall honor their responsibilities to the professions and their relationships with colleagues, students, and members of other professions and disciplines.
Principle IV, Rule A: Individuals shall uphold the dignity and autonomy of the professions, maintain harmonious interprofessional and intraprofessional relationships, and accept the professions’ self-imposed standards.
Principle IV, Rule C: Individuals shall not engage in dishonesty, fraud, deceit, or misrepresentation.
The sanction is revocation of membership and certification for three years, effective Feb. 9, 2015.
By failing to complete the documentation necessary for billing, failing to make data sheets available to the facility for billing, inadvertently taking a patient chart home, and failing to comply with repeated employer requests to complete therapy logs and other data necessary for billing for services, Julie B. Kyzima of Sanford, North Carolina, violated the following:
Principle I (see above).
Principle I, Rule M: Individuals shall adequately maintain and appropriately secure records of professional services rendered, research and scholarly activities conducted, and products dispensed, and they shall allow access to these records only when authorized or when required by law.
Principle IV (see above).
Principle IV, Rule A (see above).
The sanction is censure, effective Feb. 6, 2015.
One case involved violations of the 2003 Code of Ethics.
By pleading guilty to billing for Medicaid services that were not provided, Betty McKenzie Smith of Lake City, South Carolina, violated the following principles and rules:
Principle I: Individuals shall honor their responsibility to hold paramount the welfare of persons they serve professionally or participants in research and scholarly activities, and shall treat animals involved in research in a humane manner.
Principle I, Rule M: Individuals shall not charge for services not rendered, nor shall they misrepresent services rendered, products dispensed, or research and scholarly activities conducted.
Principle III: Individuals shall honor their responsibility to the public by promoting public understanding of the professions, by supporting the development of services designed to fulfill the unmet needs of the public, and by providing accurate information in all communications involving any aspect of the professions, including the dissemination of research findings and scholarly activities.
Principle III, Rule D: Individuals shall not misrepresent diagnostic information, research, services rendered, or products dispensed; neither shall they engage in defraud or engage in any scheme to defraud in connection with obtaining payment or reimbursement for such services, or products.
Principle IV: Individuals shall honor their responsibilities to the professions and their relationships with colleagues, students, and members of allied professions. Individuals shall uphold the dignity and autonomy of the professions, maintain harmonious interprofessional and intraprofessional relationships, and accept the professions’ self-imposed standards.
Principle IV, Rule B: Individuals shall not engage in dishonesty, fraud, deceit, misrepresentation, sexual harassment, or any other form of conduct that adversely reflects on the professions or on the individual’s fitness to serve persons professionally.
The sanction is revocation of membership and certification for 36 months, effective Feb. 9, 2015.
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May 2015
Volume 20, Issue 5