Missouri Guides Minority Students on Leadership Path In an effort to address the needs of minority students in Missouri, the Missouri Speech-Language-Hearing Association (MSHA) created a replica of ASHA’s Minority Student Leadership Program (MSLP). The new program provides mentoring for ethnic/minority students by professionals who are aware of the many challenges and benefits of being a minority ... ASHA News
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ASHA News  |   December 01, 2006
Missouri Guides Minority Students on Leadership Path
Author Notes
  • Carlotta Kimble, is vice president for clinical services for the Missouri Speech-Language-Hearing Association and past chair of its Multicultural Affairs Committee. Contact her at carliekimble@yahoo.com.
    Carlotta Kimble, is vice president for clinical services for the Missouri Speech-Language-Hearing Association and past chair of its Multicultural Affairs Committee. Contact her at carliekimble@yahoo.com.×
  • Jennifer Henkhaus, is the past vice president for clinical services for the Missouri Speech-Language-Hearing Association. Contact her at jen@cityspeech.com.
    Jennifer Henkhaus, is the past vice president for clinical services for the Missouri Speech-Language-Hearing Association. Contact her at jen@cityspeech.com.×
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / ASHA News
ASHA News   |   December 01, 2006
Missouri Guides Minority Students on Leadership Path
The ASHA Leader, December 2006, Vol. 11, 16-17. doi:10.1044/leader.AN2.11172006.16
The ASHA Leader, December 2006, Vol. 11, 16-17. doi:10.1044/leader.AN2.11172006.16
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  • Jamie Bailey (right), recipient of the 2006 Missouri Speech-Language- Hearing Association MSLP scholarship, with her mentor Rasheeda Furquan (left) and Carlotta Kimble, MSHA Minority Affairs Committee Chair and MSLP coordinator.
In an effort to address the needs of minority students in Missouri, the Missouri Speech-Language-Hearing Association (MSHA) created a replica of ASHA’s Minority Student Leadership Program (MSLP).
The new program provides mentoring for ethnic/minority students by professionals who are aware of the many challenges and benefits of being a minority in the speech-language pathology and audiology professions. The program allows minority students the opportunity to explore, participate in, and experience activities designed to facilitate leadership. The program also provides mentors with the opportunity to impart wisdom and experience to students while enhancing their own leadership skills. The MSLP provides an effective vehicle for retaining future professionals as MSHA members and, ultimately, as leaders within the state organization.
The MSHA Multicultural Affairs Committee developed the MSLP, which includes a scholarship program, in conjunction with the MSHA Executive Board.
The committee and Executive Board have strong support for the program: MSHA members are ready and willing to serve as mentors, and the Executive Board supports the program financially. In recent years, the primary challenge has been declining minority student numbers in some graduate programs across the state. The committee is working with the MSHA Executive Board to discuss the role of the association in partnering with universities across the state to increase minority student enrollment. The MSHA Executive Board is also working to increase awareness of speech-language pathology and audiology as career choices at the high school level.
Feedback from students and mentors participating in the program has been positive. Former MSLP members overwhelmingly support the mission of the program. They report a sense of confidence and purpose in their objective of achieving career and personal goals as a minority in the profession of speech-language pathology. Students report a greater confidence in their leadership ability as a consequence of the collaboration and support they experience with their mentors and fellow student members.
MSLP mentors and students have gained valuable leadership experience and have established professional and personal relationships. Lisa Panicker, MSHA’s 2005 MSLP scholarship recipient, stated, “I was given the opportunity to discuss minority issues with more experienced professionals in our field and was provided a year-long mentorship through which I gained valuable advice and guidance. I’ve also met other minorities, heard their different perspectives, and in the process have made friends and professional contacts from different parts of the state.” Jayanti Ray, Panicker’s mentor, noted “Mentoring is a lifelong relationship with the mentee. It escalates personal and professional growth that is strongly grounded in fellowship. Mentoring is an enlightening experience that leaves indelible impressions on both mentor and mentee.”
ASHA has an MSLP replication kit available to state associations that includes sample forms, agendas, and suggestions for convention activities and seminar discussion topics. Contact Melanie Johnson, coordinator of the ASHA Minority Student Leadership Program, at 301-296-8681, or mjohnson@asha.org.
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December 2006
Volume 11, Issue 17