Audiology in Brief Application Deadline: June 30 Up to 10 Audiology/Hearing Science Research Travel Awards will be given to students to facilitate their attendance at the 2008 Audiology Convention at the ASHA Convention. The awards provide recipients with the opportunity to learn more about current research, network with presenters and other colleagues, ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   May 01, 2008
Audiology in Brief
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Hearing Disorders / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   May 01, 2008
Audiology in Brief
The ASHA Leader, May 2008, Vol. 13, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.13072008.5
The ASHA Leader, May 2008, Vol. 13, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.13072008.5
Audiology/Hearing Science Research Travel Award
Application Deadline: June 30
Up to 10 Audiology/Hearing Science Research Travel Awards will be given to students to facilitate their attendance at the 2008 Audiology Convention at the ASHA Convention. The awards provide recipients with the opportunity to learn more about current research, network with presenters and other colleagues, investigate research careers, and attend scientific and professional sessions of interest. The award is offered as part of ASHA’s strategic objectives to increase the research commitment and the research base of the discipline.
Applicants who have an interest in research careers in communication sciences and disorders are especially encouraged to apply. Eligible applicants include:
  • Students pursuing a clinical (AuD) or research (PhD) doctoral degree in audiology or hearing science

  • Postdoctoral fellows in audiology or hearing science

The application deadline is June 30. For more information, visit the ASHA Web site.
Usher Syndrome Web Site
The National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) has teamed with the National Eye Institute, both components of NIH, to create a new Web site devoted to Usher syndrome. The design of the site is simple and uses large type to ease readability for people with low vision. The new Web site offers basic facts about Usher syndrome, resources for patients and families, information on clinical studies, and resources for scientists.
NIDCD also has updated its fact sheet on Usher syndrome. The new version is available in print or online. To request print copies, contact the NIDCD Information Clearinghouse at 800-241-1044 or nidcdinfo@nidcd.nih.gov.
Brain Freeze Reveals Dual Processing
The brain’s sound processing areas are split into two distinct regions—one that identifies sound and the other that localizes sound, according to research published in the April 13 Nature Neuroscience.
For decades scientists have sought to discover how sensory information is processed by the mammalian cerebral cortex. In the visual system, two different brain areas are involved in determining what an object is and where it’s located, but it was unclear whether the “what/where” hypothesis holds true for the auditory system. Researchers have now shown that dual-processing also exists in the auditory cortex.
Principal investigator Stephen Lomber of the University of Western Ontario in London, Canada, and Shveta Malhotra of the University of Texas, Dallas, placed cooling coils on the surface of the brains of three cats to reversibly deactivate specific areas of the auditory cortex as the cats listened and responded to different sounds. When the posterior auditory field was deactivated, the cats failed to locate a sound, but could still discriminate between different sound patterns. Conversely, when the anterior auditory field was deactivated, cats could localize sound, but couldn’t discriminate the sound.
While the study shows a clear functional segregation of the hearing tasks, different functional regions of the brain might be involved in human hearing. Visit The Scientist’s NewsBlog for more information.
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FROM THIS ISSUE
May 2008
Volume 13, Issue 7