Audiology in Brief Oct. 1 is the deadline for an important Medicare regulation that requires audiologists who are employees or contractors of physician practices to have their own National Provider Identifier (NPI). The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is reiterating the complete instructions in a July 18 Medicare Publication Transmittal ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   September 01, 2008
Audiology in Brief
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Hearing Disorders / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   September 01, 2008
Audiology in Brief
The ASHA Leader, September 2008, Vol. 13, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.13122008.5
The ASHA Leader, September 2008, Vol. 13, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.13122008.5
Medicare NPI Due Oct. 1
Oct. 1 is the deadline for an important Medicare regulation that requires audiologists who are employees or contractors of physician practices to have their own National Provider Identifier (NPI). The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is reiterating the complete instructions in a July 18 Medicare Publication Transmittal 1550 on the HHS Web site [PDF].
Audiologists should complete the CMS-855I enrollment form, available on your Medicare carrier’s Web site, as soon as possible, as the enrollment process can be lengthy. The CMS-855R reassignment form must also be completed to authorize that payment for your services be made to your employer. For questions or further information, please contact ASHA at reimbursement@asha.org.
Tune-Deafness and the Brain
People with tune deafness aren’t able to tell when a musician accidentally strikes the wrong note in a song, but their brains know the difference.
Researchers from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders found that people with tune deafness—an auditory processing disorder in which a person with normal hearing has trouble distinguishing notes in a melody—are able to detect a wrong note unconsciously, according to a study in the June 11 online journal PLoS ONE.
The researchers randomly screened 1,218 individuals using an online version of the Distorted Tunes Test, a standardized survey that tests a person’s ability to identify whether or not a short melody is played correctly. Seven subjects with tune deafness and 10 control subjects were selected.
Electroencephalography (EEG) was used to measure the volunteers’ responses as they listened to an altered version of the Distorted Tunes Test in which the incorrect melodies had a single wrong note at the end. Of principal interest were two signals that brains generate when presented with a stimulus that doesn’t match what the brain expects to hear, such as the wrong note in a song. The first, the mismatch negativity (MMN), is a large negative signal that occurs roughly 200 milliseconds after the unexpected stimulus is heard; the second signal, the P300, is a large positive signal occurring roughly 300 milliseconds after the unexpected stimulus.
Because tune-deaf people consistently don’t recognize a wrong note, the researchers hypothesized that their brains would not generate the MMN or P300 signals. As expected, this hypothesis was true for the MMN signal. However, in the case of the P300 signal, tune-deaf volunteers processed the wrong note in the same way as the control participants, even though they weren’t consciously aware of the deviation. To read the article, visit the PLoS ONE Web site.
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September 2008
Volume 13, Issue 12