Hydration and Dysphagia Management As clinicians we are concerned during our evaluations when we detect aberrations of the swallow. We can appreciate their full meaning when we acknowledge that dysphagia does not exist in a vacuum; it exists within a human organism and may cause the individual to develop co-morbidities, such as dehydration. Maintenance ... Features
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Features  |   October 01, 2008
Hydration and Dysphagia Management
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Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Features
Features   |   October 01, 2008
Hydration and Dysphagia Management
The ASHA Leader, October 2008, Vol. 13, 10. doi:10.1044/leader.FTR1.13142008.10
The ASHA Leader, October 2008, Vol. 13, 10. doi:10.1044/leader.FTR1.13142008.10
As clinicians we are concerned during our evaluations when we detect aberrations of the swallow. We can appreciate their full meaning when we acknowledge that dysphagia does not exist in a vacuum; it exists within a human organism and may cause the individual to develop co-morbidities, such as dehydration. Maintenance of hydration is a critical management issue for patients with dysphagia. Our clinical decisions for patients with dysphagia depend on our understanding of hydration, dehydration, and methods for clinical management.
The first of the following two articles deals with the fundamental mechanisms underlying hydration and dehydration. Knowledge of these concepts is important as we craft our management plans for patients with dysphagia. The second article deals with common difficulties encountered when thickened liquids are employed in dysphagia management.
Russell H. Mills
Our clinical decisions depend on how well we understand the basic mechanisms of hydration, dehydration, and aging and fluid balance.
Thickened liquids are commonly recommended by clinicians for dysphagia management, but their use can present challenges.
Hydration Issues in December Perspectives

Authors Russell H. Mills and John R. Ashford discuss related issues in an article scheduled for publication in the December issue of Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders, the member publication of Special Interest Division 13, Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders.

The article, “A Methodology for the Inclusion of Laboratory Assessment in the Evaluation of Dysphagia,” is one of a group of articles on the topic of physiology and pharmacology of dysphagia, the focus topic of the December issue. Mills and Ashford will describe a specific health status model proposed by Mills. They will also address use of specific blood tests to examine health status variables and laboratory assessment to examine immune system status and infection and their potential relationship with pneumonia.

From Nov. 1, 2008, to Jan. 31, 2009, all ASHA members can enjoy full-text access to the Mills and Ashford article and to all other content available in the new, Internet-only Division publications, Perspectives. When the period closes, full access will be available only to affiliates of the respective divisions. To view content, members must first activate their HighWire subscriptions (use ASHA ID and password). When prompted, members provide their the user ID and password to access full text of Perspectives articles.

Division affiliates can earn ASHA CEUs for self-study of Perspectives. For information on joining a division, go to the ASHA Web site or call the Action Center at 800-489-2071.

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October 2008
Volume 13, Issue 14