Tuning In: Radio Program Targets Speech-Language and Hearing Professionals Thanks to the Internet and satellite broadcast, specialized radio programs seem to exist for almost any audience, targeting music aficionados, foreign-language devotees, and talk show fans alike. Now speech-language pathologists and audiologists also can tune in to a unique spot on the Internet radio “dial.” The Mississippi Speech-Language-Hearing Association (MSHA) ... ASHA News
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ASHA News  |   October 01, 2008
Tuning In: Radio Program Targets Speech-Language and Hearing Professionals
Author Notes
  • Dee Naquin Shafer, an assistant managing editor of The ASHA Leader, can be reached at dshafer@asha.org.
    Dee Naquin Shafer, an assistant managing editor of The ASHA Leader, can be reached at dshafer@asha.org.×
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Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Language Disorders / Reading & Writing Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / ASHA News
ASHA News   |   October 01, 2008
Tuning In: Radio Program Targets Speech-Language and Hearing Professionals
The ASHA Leader, October 2008, Vol. 13, 30-31. doi:10.1044/leader.AN1.13142008.30
The ASHA Leader, October 2008, Vol. 13, 30-31. doi:10.1044/leader.AN1.13142008.30
Thanks to the Internet and satellite broadcast, specialized radio programs seem to exist for almost any audience, targeting music aficionados, foreign-language devotees, and talk show fans alike. Now speech-language pathologists and audiologists also can tune in to a unique spot on the Internet radio “dial.”
The Mississippi Speech-Language-Hearing Association (MSHA) is reaching out to its members and others through MSHA Radio. SLP Ricky W. Burk is drawing on a background in broadcast, recording, and communication disorders to produce a 30-minute talk-format show for SLPs and audiologists.
Since January, the show has been available live over the Internet every Tuesday at 3 p.m. (Central Time). About an hour after each broadcast, a recording of the show is posted at the same Web address for replay and/or download.
MSHA Radio’s goal is to promote and disseminate information to members through interviews with those involved in current research and those publishing new work, Burk said.
“When BlogTalkRadio became available online, I thought it sounded like a perfect match. We just fired it up and gave it a try,” he said, noting that the cost was right—zero.
An Executive Board member of MSHA since 1997 and vice president for publications, Burk envisioned the radio program as a different way of reaching out to members. He started his career in speech-language pathology in public schools before switching into radio and recording, doing voice-overs, commercials, and production. After more than a decade, he returned to work as an SLP in public schools and private practice.
“BlogTalkRadio is a relatively new online application that has taken a rocket-style lift-off,” he said. Listeners access the live broadcast online and can call in to make comments or ask questions. Up to five people may be on air at one time during the live broadcast. Some use a microphone connected to their computer to call, while most call on a standard land line or cell phone.
“It’s absolutely amazing. The speech-language pathology and audiology market is a really, really narrow market,” Burk said. “We had no idea how many people were going to listen live and/or download.”
The primary outreach was to MSHA members. The live broadcast still has a low number of listeners compared to the high number of replays, but Burk notes a phenomenal response, with more than 5,000 downloads so far. Listeners can also subscribe to the blog, automatically receiving recorded shows into a computer or MP3 player.
Burk’s first radio experience was in high school for a class project on public speaking. He said his undergraduate and graduate study in disordered and non-disordered (broadcast) speech has benefitted his work as an SLP.
Burk also brings empathy for those with hearing loss to his work. After an auto accident last year, he wears bilateral hearing aids. Burk considers them assistive technology devices and said that he has made no substantial changes clinically.
MSHA is seeking a sponsor to offset the cost of transcribing the program to enable access for those who are hard of hearing or deaf. The transcript would be posted on the Web after the broadcast. MSHA also is exploring outlets that might be able to provide real-time transcription.
Ricky W. Burk, vice president for publications, Mississippi Speech-Language-Hearing Association, can be reached at editor@mshausa.org or 800-664-6742, ext. 2. He welcomes suggestions for guests and topics.
Online Resources
Archive for MSHA Radio

Following is a list of past shows available for replay or download from the MHSA Radio Web site:

John Haskell—Exercises for Voice Therapy

Stephen Sieglema—Co-articulation therapy

Hope Reed—Counseling Techniques

Ann Kummer—Cleft Palate and Resonance Disorders

Lynly Stephen—New Techniques for Literacy Development

Bonnie Martin-Harris—Evaluation and Treatment of Voice and Resonance Disorders

Marshall Chasin—Musicians and Hearing Aids

Robert Frisina—The Aging Auditory System

Kristin Chemela—Working With School-age Children Who Stutter

Carol Gray—Social Stories

Cassondra Holly—Functional Communication with Dual Sensory Loss

Ray Hull—Talking With Children

Ladell Kraft and Sara Case-Price—Prerequisites and Enhancements of Language Development, Birth to Three years

Charlann S. Simon—Connecting Speech and Literacy

Frances Pomaville—Assessment of Communication Disorders in Children

Martine Vanryckegham—Behavior Assessment in School-age Children Who Stutter

Donna Geffner and Deborah Ross-Swain—Auditory Processing Disorders

Glen M. Tellis—Clinician Views About Assessment and Treatment of Stuttering

Audrey Holland—Counseling in the Communication Disorders From a Wellness Perspective

Julie Marinac—Phonological Core Dyslexia in Secondary Students

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October 2008
Volume 13, Issue 14