Analysis Available of Final NCLB Regulations To assist members in implementing the recently announced 2008 final regulations for Title 1 of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act, ASHA has released a detailed analysis of key sections. The final regulations, which took effect on Nov. 28, 2008, amend current Title 1 regulations in the areas of ... Policy Analysis
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Policy Analysis  |   February 01, 2009
Analysis Available of Final NCLB Regulations
Author Notes
  • Catherine D. Clarke, director of education and regulatory advocacy, can be reached at cclarke@asha.org or 800-498-2071, ext. 5611.
    Catherine D. Clarke, director of education and regulatory advocacy, can be reached at cclarke@asha.org or 800-498-2071, ext. 5611.×
Article Information
Regulatory, Legislative & Advocacy / Policy Analysis
Policy Analysis   |   February 01, 2009
Analysis Available of Final NCLB Regulations
The ASHA Leader, February 2009, Vol. 14, 3. doi:10.1044/leader.PA2.14022009.3
The ASHA Leader, February 2009, Vol. 14, 3. doi:10.1044/leader.PA2.14022009.3
To assist members in implementing the recently announced 2008 final regulations for Title 1 of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act, ASHA has released a detailed analysis of key sections. The final regulations, which took effect on Nov. 28, 2008, amend current Title 1 regulations in the areas of assessment, accountability, public school choice, and supplemental educational services.
Guided by input from a member advisory group, ASHA identified key issues for speech-language pathologists and audiologists in the regulations. The following are highlights of ASHA’s analysis:
  • Assessments. All state assessments must involve multiple measures of academic achievement for all students, including those with disabilities. The regulations also clarify the meaning of “multiple measures” in the statute to mean that states may use single- or multiple-question formats, or multiple assessments within a subject area.

  • High school graduation rates. The most significant change in the regulations is the establishment of a uniform and more accurate measure of calculating graduation rates that is comparable across states. The regulations also allow states to develop an “extended-year adjusted cohort graduation rate” for approval by the U.S. Department of Education.

  • Growth models. Regulations allow all states to request authority to incorporate individual student academic growth (using what is often referred to as a “growth model”) in a state’s definition of adequate yearly progress. Students with disabilities must be assessed based on the state’s grade-level academic achievement standards, not a student’s Individualized Education Program goals.

  • School improvement and supplemental educational services. Local Education Agencies (LEAs) are required to indicate in a notice to parents those supplemental educational service providers who are able to serve students with disabilities or students with limited English proficiency. LEAs are also required to provide certain information about public school choice and supplemental education services on its Web site in a timely manner to ensure that parents have current information.

Members can access ASHA’s full analysis on ASHA’s Web site. The analysis outlines major changes in the regulations, ASHA’s position on the issues, and the impact of the changes on members. The final regulations were released in the Oct. 29, 2008 issue of the Federal Register [PDF].
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FROM THIS ISSUE
February 2009
Volume 14, Issue 2