Audiology in Brief A case study reported in the Dec. 17, 2008, issue of the British Medical Journal documented noise-induced hearing loss as the result of playing golf. According to the study by otolaryngologists in Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, a 55-year-old, right-handed man presented with tinnitus and a 50 dB noise ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   February 01, 2009
Audiology in Brief
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Hearing Disorders / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   February 01, 2009
Audiology in Brief
The ASHA Leader, February 2009, Vol. 14, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.14022009.5
The ASHA Leader, February 2009, Vol. 14, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.14022009.5
Golf and Hearing Loss
A case study reported in the Dec. 17, 2008, issue of the British Medical Journal documented noise-induced hearing loss as the result of playing golf.
According to the study by otolaryngologists in Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, a 55-year-old, right-handed man presented with tinnitus and a 50 dB noise notch at 4K in his right ear. He had no history of occupational or recreational noise exposure or exposure to ototoxic substances. The man reported playing golf with a King Cobra LD—a thin-faced titanium club—three times a week for 18 months, and commented that hitting the ball was “like a gun going off.”
The physicians recruited a professional golfer to hit shots with six different thin-faced titanium clubs and six thicker-faced stainless steel models and found that the titanium clubs produced a louder sound, with the loudest club reaching 130 dB.
Lead study author Malcolm Buchanan, an otolaryngologist and avid golfer, said, “Our results show that thin-faced titanium drivers may produce sufficient sound to induce temporary or even permanent cochlear damage in susceptible individuals.” Visit the BMJ Web site to read the study.
Join the Walk4Hearing
The Hearing Loss Association of America (HLAA) invites ASHA members to join the 2009 Walk4Hearing. Now in its fourth year, the walk will be held in 20 cities nationwide with an anticipated 6,000 walkers bringing attention to hearing loss.
“We are on the move to make hearing loss visible to the American public. We have never done anything on this scale before in the history of our organization. And you can help make it happen,” said Anne Pope, HLAA past president.
Audiologists and speech-language pathologists are invited to walk with individuals with hearing loss, their families and friends, corporate employees, and other professionals to show support for the cause and increase public awareness of hearing loss. The walk is attracting baby boomers, young adults, and parents of children with hearing loss. Audiologists and SLPs can walk individually, form a team, or sponsor a local walk and help raise money for programs and services for people with hearing loss. To find a walk near you, go to the Walk4Hearing Web site.
$1 Million for Tinnitus Study
The Department of Defense recently awarded $1 million in funding to Neuromonics, Inc., to study the treatment of tinnitus among military service members. The study will evaluate the Neuromonics Tinnitus Treatment and counseling for active-duty service members at large military installations. The study is also expected to include technological changes to the tinnitus treatment device and evaluation of treatment for specific subgroups of service members, such as those with post-traumatic stress disorder or traumatic brain injury.
The Neuromonics Tinnitus Treatment is used in 30 Veterans Affairs and six Department of Defense medical centers throughout the country. The compact device delivers an acoustical neural stimulus, incorporating relaxing music and customized for a patient’s audiological profile. The patient listens to the device daily for more than six months. During the initial treatment phase, the stimulus is designed to provide relief and relaxation and then, over a period of several months, to facilitate desensitization to tinnitus. The treatment helps the brain filter out the tinnitus perception so that the condition no longer intrudes on the patient’s conscious attention. For more information, go to the Neuromonics Web site.
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FROM THIS ISSUE
February 2009
Volume 14, Issue 2