Audiology in Brief A five-part online video series to help consumers choose a hearing aid-compatible (HAC) wireless device is available from the Wireless Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center (Wireless RERC) and CTIA-The Wireless Association®. Each video breaks down information consumers need into easy-to-understand segments. The first segment features an audiologist presenting information about ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   March 01, 2009
Audiology in Brief
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Hearing Disorders / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   March 01, 2009
Audiology in Brief
The ASHA Leader, March 2009, Vol. 14, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.14042009.5
The ASHA Leader, March 2009, Vol. 14, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.14042009.5
Cell Phone Compatibility
A five-part online video series to help consumers choose a hearing aid-compatible (HAC) wireless device is available from the Wireless Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center (Wireless RERC) and CTIA-The Wireless Association®. Each video breaks down information consumers need into easy-to-understand segments.
The first segment features an audiologist presenting information about HAC wireless devices. Other videos in the series explain how to use the HAC ratings to choose a wireless device and offer helpful tips before starting a search. The second segment demonstrates a suggested “try and buy” process at a wireless carrier’s retail store. The videos, available on the AccessWireless’s Web site, are captioned for consumer accessibility; text transcripts also are available.
CAA Site Visitors Needed
The Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology (CAA) is seeking applications for qualified audiology practitioners and academics to serve as accreditation site visitors to graduate education programs in audiology. Details about this volunteer opportunity are posted on the CAA Web site.
The CAA accredits 70 clinical doctoral programs in audiology and has awarded candidate status to two programs. These programs represent a variety of institutions and education delivery modalities (e.g., public/private, small/large, distance education, consortia). For a complete listing of accredited programs, visit the ASHA Web site [PDF].
If you meet the specified eligibility criteria and are interested in promoting quality academic programs, please submit an application to become a CAA site visitor. All applications are due in the Accreditation Office by March 31. Notification of selected candidates will be made in April. For more information contact Sue Flesher, associate director of accreditation services, at 301-296-5781 or sflesher@asha.org.
Searching for Synesthesia Genes
When researcher Julian Asher listens to an orchestra, he doesn’t just hear music, he also sees it, according to a CNN report. The sounds of a violin are perceived as a rich burgundy color, shiny and fluid like red wine, while a cello’s music flows like honey in a golden yellow hue.
Asher, a researcher in the department of genomic medicine at Imperial College London, has a rare neurological condition—synesthesia—in which people experience a mixing of their senses. People with synesthesia may see colors and movement in numbers, words, or sounds.
As many as 1% of the population has the auditory-visual form of synesthesia, which is most common, including author Vladimir Nabokov, physicist Richard Feynman, and composer Franz Liszt.
Researchers have known for a century that synesthesia is genetic, but Asher and colleagues have done the first genetic study, analyzing DNA from 196 people from 43 families that have multiple members with synesthesia. The researchers expected to find a single gene responsible for the disorder, but found that the condition was linked to regions on chromosomes 2, 5, 6, and 12.
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FROM THIS ISSUE
March 2009
Volume 14, Issue 4