Audiology in Brief A new review of existing research notes problems with mandatory hearing-loss prevention programs in the workplace. Researchers reviewed 14 studies with 75,672 participants that looked at prevention programs, such as noise monitoring, and another six with 169 participants that examined specific hearing-protection devices like earplugs. Although workers theoretically wear ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   September 01, 2009
Audiology in Brief
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Hearing Disorders / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   September 01, 2009
Audiology in Brief
The ASHA Leader, September 2009, Vol. 14, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.14122009.5
The ASHA Leader, September 2009, Vol. 14, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.14122009.5
Effectiveness of Hearing Loss Programs Reviewed
A new review of existing research notes problems with mandatory hearing-loss prevention programs in the workplace. Researchers reviewed 14 studies with 75,672 participants that looked at prevention programs, such as noise monitoring, and another six with 169 participants that examined specific hearing-protection devices like earplugs. Although workers theoretically wear earplugs to protect hearing, one-size-fits-all plugs and lack of education and enforcement render these measures ineffective, the review authors found. Studies that examined prevention programs had mixed results; some showed that workers still had a three-fold risk of hearing loss compared to workers not exposed to noise, in spite of a prevention program. This review appears in The Cochrane Library.
Otitis Media and Language
Early otitis media and underlying hearing loss in the first two years of life have no effect on either language comprehension or production skills by the time a child reaches school age, according to researchers at Maastricht University in The Netherlands. In a prospective study, the researchers documented the middle-ear status of 65 healthy children every three months during the first two years of life. The children’s language comprehension and production were evaluated at 27 months and 7 years of age. The results showed that early negative consequences of otitis media and underlying hearing loss on language development were resolved by the time the children reached age 7. The study, in the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, is in press.
New Otitis Media Vaccines
Vaccines are under development that offer protection against otitis media caused by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and by Moraxella catarrhalis. These new vaccines against otitis media could prevent millions of cases in the United States annually, and if priced comparably with other recently introduced vaccines, could achieve cost-effectiveness that is equivalent to or better than the current vaccine on the market, according to a computerized cost-utility model developed by the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. The study appears in the June 2009 issue of Pediatrics.
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September 2009
Volume 14, Issue 12