David Luterman In my 20s, our first child Scot was diagnosed with severe hearing loss. Luckily, we had moved to greater Boston where we learned of a new program at Emerson College for children who are deaf. As it turned out, the main focus of the program was on the parents ... Golden Apple
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Golden Apple  |   January 01, 2010
David Luterman
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Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / School-Based Settings / Healthcare Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Golden Apple
Golden Apple   |   January 01, 2010
David Luterman
The ASHA Leader, January 2010, Vol. 15, 39. doi:10.1044/leader.GA1.15012010.39
The ASHA Leader, January 2010, Vol. 15, 39. doi:10.1044/leader.GA1.15012010.39
David Luterman
In my 20s, our first child Scot was diagnosed with severe hearing loss. Luckily, we had moved to greater Boston where we learned of a new program at Emerson College for children who are deaf. As it turned out, the main focus of the program was on the parents of these children. Through the wise guidance of Dr. David Luterman we were able to share our sadness and fears with other parents, to see our children as individuals with a need to communicate, and to feel a confidence in raising them. Scot grew and blossomed with the help of understanding teachers and therapists.
When I was in my 40s, my husband died suddenly. Again it was Dr. Luterman who listened to my sorrow and fear. He was still a professor teaching audiology and counseling at Emerson and the parent-centered program continued to thrive. Through our talks, I decided to study at Emerson with the goal of becoming a speech-language pathologist. It was a challenging time but one that provided a focus and the excitement that comes with new learning.
Now that I am in my late 60s, Dr. Luterman continues to inspire. I have had a wonderful career working in rehab hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, and schools. At present, working with preschoolers with disfluency, I ordered from the Stuttering Foundation a DVD featuring Dr. Luterman on the topic of sharpening counseling skills. The message is still there: listen and accept, and help individuals find their own way to problem-solving. I know there are countless others who, with me, would award the Golden Apple to Dr. David Luterman.
Lydia Atkins
Damariscotta, Maine
Gerard Caracciolo
I met Dr. Caracciolo when I was an undergraduate at Montclair State University (MSC) in the late 1960s. My roommate Kathy O’Donnell and I changed our majors to speech-language pathology after our first year. Our first course required observation of treatment. We were seated in a small room with a two-way mirror looking into one of the new treatment rooms at the university clinic. Dr. Gerard Caracciolo was about to begin a session with a young child. That half-hour sealed my future professional career. Each move he made and every response from the child signaled a response in my brain. I had to do this—to be so knowledgeable, kind, artistic, and helpful!
Dr. Caracciolo was my professor at MSC. I got to know his lovely wife, Elaine, and their children, Ava and Lisa. He recommended Rutgers for my master’s degree. While he continued teaching, Dr. Caracciolo became active in ASHA. For nine years he mentored me as a school clinician. Then he encouraged me to begin my practice, Bergen County Speech and Language Associates, which specializes in parent-partnered intervention for children. He always was available to answer my many questions.
Recently, I invited Dr. Caracciolo to visit the practice and observe me. He asked why I wanted him there, and I responded, “to mentor me and perhaps ‘kvel’ (which means “to take pride” in Yiddish). It was a wonderful day for everyone!
Nanc E. Fellerman
Norwood, N.J.
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January 2010
Volume 15, Issue 1