Audiology In Brief The 1.6 million residents of Botswana, South Africa, now will be able to receive speech and hearing services at Princess Marina Hospital (PMH), which established the first Speech Therapy and Audiology Center in the country. Kutlwelo Mariri, who has degrees in both audiology and speech-language pathology, established the center ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   October 01, 2009
Audiology In Brief
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Hearing Disorders / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   October 01, 2009
Audiology In Brief
The ASHA Leader, October 2009, Vol. 14, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.14132009.5
The ASHA Leader, October 2009, Vol. 14, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.14132009.5
Botswana Opens First Speech and Hearing Center
The 1.6 million residents of Botswana, South Africa, now will be able to receive speech and hearing services at Princess Marina Hospital (PMH), which established the first Speech Therapy and Audiology Center in the country.
Kutlwelo Mariri, who has degrees in both audiology and speech-language pathology, established the center after treating many stroke patients who were trying to regain their speech. There also were many children who were not talking despite having normal hearing.
The center, which is located in the capital city of Gaborone at one of the two public hospitals in the country, has helped 70 stroke patients regain their speech and return to work. Mariri hopes that by 2016 the center will be able to screen all babies born at PMG for hearing loss 24 hours after birth. “We also hope that someday we will have cochlear implants to allow children to hear and learn to talk. We are excited about the future,” she said.
Tuning the Ear to Understand Speech
Musicians, who are trained to hear sounds embedded within melodies and harmonies, are primed to understand speech in noise, according to a Northwestern University study.
The findings support the potential use of musical training as part of aural rehabilitation to address auditory processing and communication disorders throughout the lifespan, said audiologist Nina Krause, director of Northwestern’s Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory.
The 31 study participants, all with normal hearing and a mean age of 23, were placed into two groups, determined by whether or not they had musical training. When listening to sentences with increasing levels of background noise, musicians outperformed non-musicians on sentence understanding and had more fine-grained frequency discrimination and better working memory. The study, “Musician Enhancement for Speech-in-Noise,” is published ahead of print in Ear and Hearing.
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October 2009
Volume 14, Issue 13