Research Symposium Probes Neural Regeneration More than 100 scientists and clinical professionals gathered in New Orleans in November for “Neural Regeneration and Communication Processes,” ASHA’s 19th annual research symposium. The full-day symposium, held concurrently with the annual ASHA convention, is funded by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD). The event is ... ASHA News
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ASHA News  |   January 01, 2010
Research Symposium Probes Neural Regeneration
Author Notes
  • Margaret Rogers, PhD, CCC-SLP, chief staff officer for science and research, can be reached at mrogers@asha.org for information on the symposia or other research initiatives.
    Margaret Rogers, PhD, CCC-SLP, chief staff officer for science and research, can be reached at mrogers@asha.org for information on the symposia or other research initiatives.×
Article Information
Healthcare Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Regulatory, Legislative & Advocacy / ASHA News & Member Stories / ASHA News
ASHA News   |   January 01, 2010
Research Symposium Probes Neural Regeneration
The ASHA Leader, January 2010, Vol. 15, 26. doi:10.1044/leader.AN4.15012010.26
The ASHA Leader, January 2010, Vol. 15, 26. doi:10.1044/leader.AN4.15012010.26
More than 100 scientists and clinical professionals gathered in New Orleans in November for “Neural Regeneration and Communication Processes,” ASHA’s 19th annual research symposium. The full-day symposium, held concurrently with the annual ASHA convention, is funded by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD). The event is organized by ASHA’s Scientific Informatics and Research Programs unit and supported by ASHA members who wrote the grant application in 2006 that funds the symposia through 2011.
This year’s symposium, organized by Julie Barkmeier-Kraemer (University of Arizona) and Brenda Ryalls (James Madison University), featured three renowned senior scientists: Tessa Gordon (University of Alberta), who spoke on the physiology of neural injury and regeneration in both the central nervous system and the peripheral nervous system; Jeff Kleim (University of Florida), who addressed neural regeneration of the motor cortex, especially as it relates to rehabilitation; and Yehoash Raphael (University of Michigan Medical School) who discussed inner-ear tissue engineering to restore hearing.
The symposium also features the work of more junior scientists; the 2009 presenters and topics included Kazuo Oshima (Stanford University), hair cell regeneration through manipulation of stem cells; Michele Ciucci (University of Wisconsin-Madison), striatal-dopaminergic neuron recovery with behavioral intervention; and Doug Van Daele (University of Iowa), laryngeal muscle fiber changes with denervation.
ASHA’s annual research symposium grants fund convention and symposium attendance for up to five doctoral students and provides a structure for these individuals to be mentored throughout convention. The 2009 recipients of the Research Symposium Mentoring-Pair award were: Yi-Chi Lo (University of Wisconsin-Madison) and mentor Cynthia Fowler (University of Wisconsin-Madison); Stacy Harnish (University of Florida) and mentor Jeff Kleim (University of Florida); Jun Wang (University of Nebraska-Lincoln) and mentor Brad Story (University of Arizona); Michelle Quinn (University of Iowa) and mentor Bruce Tomblin (University of Iowa); and Peter Meulenbroek (University of Wisconsin-Madison) and mentor Malcolm McNeil (University of Pittsburgh).
The mentors and mentees also were invited to participate in a luncheon that featured Steve Barlow (University of Kansas) and Diane Bless (University of Wisconsin-Madison), who spoke about the importance and challenges of developing and maintaining research collaborations.
Future research symposia topics include:
  • Neural Plasticity: Mechanisms and Drivers of Functional Recovery in the Mature Brain (2010 ASHA convention) will examine the different forms and theories of neural plasticity and how the factors driving brain plasticity may be applied to the rehabilitation of individuals with acquired neurological communication and swallowing disorders.

  • Neurobiological Bases of Auditory and Speech Perception (2011 ASHA convention).

Research Symposia Planning Committee

ASHA volunteers involved in writing the NIDCD grant and planning the 2007–2011 research symposia include:

  • Julie Barkmeier-Kraemer, University of Arizona

  • Steven Barlow, University of Kansas

  • Marc Fey, University of Kansas Medical Center

  • Lisa Hunter, University of Utah-Health Science Center

  • Amanda Owen, University of Iowa

  • Leslie Gonzalez Rothi, University of Florida/VAMC

  • Margaret Rogers, ASHA (then at the University of Washington)

  • Brenda Ryals, James Madison University

  • Diane Scott, North Carolina Central University

  • Linda Shuster, West Virginia University

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January 2010
Volume 15, Issue 1