Audiology in Brief The Who’s guitarist, Pete Townshend, has warned music lovers to turn the volume down, after revealing that increasing deafness may force him into retirement. Townshend, 60, said he has been unable to complete recording sessions for a new Who album because of irreparable hearing loss he has suffered. Townshend ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   February 01, 2006
Audiology in Brief
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Hearing Disorders / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   February 01, 2006
Audiology in Brief
The ASHA Leader, February 2006, Vol. 11, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.11022006.5
The ASHA Leader, February 2006, Vol. 11, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.11022006.5
Rock Star Warns Listeners
The Who’s guitarist, Pete Townshend, has warned music lovers to turn the volume down, after revealing that increasing deafness may force him into retirement. Townshend, 60, said he has been unable to complete recording sessions for a new Who album because of irreparable hearing loss he has suffered.
Townshend is famous for antics on stage when he would smash guitars, often throwing them into his amplifiers and speaker cabinets. Although the first incident of guitar-smashing was thought to be an accident, the onstage destruction of instruments became a regular part of The Who’s performances.
Writing on his Web site, Townshend said that excessive volume at the group’s explosive 1960s concerts was not the cause. He blamed the earsplitting sounds emitted through studio headphones during years of recording.
He warned the users of iPod headphones: “My intuition tells me there is terrible trouble ahead.”
Natus Buying Bio-Logic
Natus Medical Inc., a maker of medical tests for infants, is buying Bio-logic Systems Corp., which makes hearing tests, along with computer diagnostics for brain and sleep disorders. Natus said it expects the acquisition to expand its distribution and increase its opportunities for growth. The deal is valued at $66 million.
The Ear Popper
A non-medical treatment is now available for children with persistent middle ear effusion (MEE). Known as the EarPopper, a modified Politzer device, it was used by 94 children in a controlled clinical trial.
Researchers modified the Politzer method by forcing air through the nostril with a 1 ounce infant nasal syringe. Children were 4 to 11 years old, with at least a two-month history of MEE and associated hearing loss. Efficacy of the Politzer treatment was determined by comparing pre-therapy and post-therapy air conduction thresholds, tympanometric peak pressures (TPPs), and otoscopic findings.
At the end of the study, all measured outcomes improved significantly in the treatment group, but none did in the control group. Hearing sensitivity was within normal limits at study end in 73.9% of the treated ears, but in only 26.7% of the control ears.
The authors recommend future research to generalize findings to children younger than 4 years, to teenagers, and to adults and also to explore long-term outcomes. The Small Business Innovation Research Program, National Institutes on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, and National Institutes of Health supported this study.
Visit http://www.EarPopper.com for a full description of the device.
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February 2006
Volume 11, Issue 2