Audiology in Brief ASHA and the Consumer Electronics Association (CEA) have joined forces to further develop and promote Listen To Your Buds, a unique ASHA online resource that educates young children, parents, and educators about the potential risk of hearing loss from unsafe use of personal audio technology. Virginia-based CEA is the ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   July 01, 2007
Audiology in Brief
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Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Early Identification & Intervention / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   July 01, 2007
Audiology in Brief
The ASHA Leader, July 2007, Vol. 12, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.12092007.5
The ASHA Leader, July 2007, Vol. 12, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.12092007.5
ASHA Partners with CEA
ASHA and the Consumer Electronics Association (CEA) have joined forces to further develop and promote Listen To Your Buds, a unique ASHA online resource that educates young children, parents, and educators about the potential risk of hearing loss from unsafe use of personal audio technology.
Virginia-based CEA is the preeminent consumer technology industry trade association, promoting growth through technology policy, events, research, promotion, and business and strategic relationships.
“We are very grateful for this opportunity to work with CEA in disseminating our vital message about the importance of safe use of personal audio technology,” said ASHA President Noma Anderson.
“We’re pleased to support ASHA on this important public education campaign,” said Gary Shapiro, CEA president and CEO. “CEA’s goal is to keep consumers listening for a lifetime. Once consumers understand the potential risks associated with improper use of personal audio devices, then protecting their hearing is easy.”
CEA’s support will help ASHA periodically refresh features of the Web site, including an interactive game that teaches children about safe listening. The site is promoted through interactive online educational sites that attract hundreds of thousands of young children. The partnership is part of ASHA’s public education campaign “America: Tuned in Today…But Tuned Out Tomorrow?,” which focuses on the risk of hearing loss from unsafe use of personal audio technology.
EHDI Follow-Up in Los Angeles
Infant hearing screening has been added to each child’s medical chart alongside other well-baby tests and measurements at five community clinics in Los Angeles. The new protocol is part of the Baby Sound Check® program developed by John Tracy Clinic (JTC) in collaboration with AltaMed Health Services Corporation, St. John’s Well Child and Family Center, South Central Family Health Center, and Venice Family Clinic.
“As many as 30% to 50% of babies who do not pass hospital screenings at birth slip through the cracks,” said Christine Gilmore Eubanks, JTC audiologist and director of the Baby Sound Check program.
“There is a critical need to test babies at community clinics, where many parents already take their children for their regular check-ups.”
Baby Sound Check will assess and monitor the hearing of more than 10,000 children at the participating clinics and thousands more in its first three years as the program becomes self-sustaining through federal reimbursements.
“There are significant gaps in state newborn hearing screening procedures caused by babies with fluid in the ears, later onset hearing loss, and lack of consistent follow-up,” Eubanks said.
JTC audiologists will train staff at five AltaMed clinics in the East Los Angeles area to use infant hearing screening technologies that have recently become affordable, portable, and simpler. The program will then merge into existing well-baby care.
Children suspected of hearing loss will be referred to JTC for free comprehensive diagnostic evaluation, appropriate referral, and follow-up. If hearing loss is confirmed, the families will receive guidance and information from counselors and audiologists; be assigned a case manager; and be invited to join JTC’s free parent/infant program.
Funding for Baby Sound Check has been provided by Phil Rosenthal, producer of the long-running sitcom “Everybody Loves Raymond,” and his wife, Monica, an actress in the series.
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July 2007
Volume 12, Issue 9