Children’s Study Adds Research Centers The National Children’s Study (NCS) is adding 22 new study centers in 26 additional communities across the United States. The new centers and the study’s initial phase will be funded by a $69 million appropriation from Congress in fiscal year 2007. According to Peter Scheidt, NCS director, the centers will ... On the Pulse
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On the Pulse  |   November 01, 2007
Children’s Study Adds Research Centers
Author Notes
  • Neil Snyder, director of federal advocacy, can be reached at nsnyder@asha.org.
    Neil Snyder, director of federal advocacy, can be reached at nsnyder@asha.org.×
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Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Autism Spectrum / Healthcare Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Regulatory, Legislative & Advocacy / On the Pulse
On the Pulse   |   November 01, 2007
Children’s Study Adds Research Centers
The ASHA Leader, November 2007, Vol. 12, 1-8. doi:10.1044/leader.OTP.12152007.1
The ASHA Leader, November 2007, Vol. 12, 1-8. doi:10.1044/leader.OTP.12152007.1
The National Children’s Study (NCS) is adding 22 new study centers in 26 additional communities across the United States. The new centers and the study’s initial phase will be funded by a $69 million appropriation from Congress in fiscal year 2007.
According to Peter Scheidt, NCS director, the centers will begin hiring and training staff, holding informational meetings with local community groups and health care professionals, and forming community advisory boards on a range of study-related issues.
The NCS will follow a representative sample of 100,000 children from before birth to age 21 in the largest national study conducted on the effects of environmental and genetic factors on child and human health. Although the study will span many years, results will be made public periodically, with preliminary results possibly available by 2010.
Created by the Children’s Health Act of 2000, the study seeks information to prevent and treat some of the nation’s most pressing health problems, including autism, birth defects, diabetes, heart disease, and obesity. The NCS will address multiple questions on multiple issues:
  • Can very early exposure to some allergens actually help children remain asthma-free?

  • How do genes and the environment interact to promote or prevent violent behavior in teenagers?

  • Are lack of exercise and poor diet the only reasons why many children are overweight?

The Oct. 4 expansion notice coincided with launch of the Congressional Children’s Study Working Group, announced by Reps. Doris Matsui (D-California) and Christopher Smith (R-New Jersey).
“By investing in research now, we can help to make sure that the next generation of American kids grows up healthier than the last,” Matsui said.
Smith said the bipartisan group would focus attention on and amplify the findings and recommendations of the NCS, adding, “Good policy flows from good and accurate data.”
The NCS eventually will be conducted in 105 locations across the United States, pending additional funding. The NCS centers consist of universities, hospitals, and health departments, or represent collaborations between these or other organizations. The study is led by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (through the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) and by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
Additional information about the NCS is available from www.nationalchildrensstudy.gov.
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November 2007
Volume 12, Issue 15