Audiology in Brief The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) informed health care professionals of reports of sudden decrease in or loss of hearing following the use of PDE5 inhibitors Viagra, Levitra, and Cialis for the treatment of erectile dysfunction and Revatio for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension. In some cases, ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   November 01, 2007
Audiology in Brief
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Hearing Disorders / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   November 01, 2007
Audiology in Brief
The ASHA Leader, November 2007, Vol. 12, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.12162007.5
The ASHA Leader, November 2007, Vol. 12, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.12162007.5
Hearing Loss and Drugs for Erectile Dysfunction
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) informed health care professionals of reports of sudden decrease in or loss of hearing following the use of PDE5 inhibitors Viagra, Levitra, and Cialis for the treatment of erectile dysfunction and Revatio for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension. In some cases, the sudden hearing loss was accompanied by tinnitus and dizziness. Medical follow-up on these reports was often limited, making it difficult to determine if the loss of hearing was related to the use of one of the drugs, an underlying medical condition, other risk factors for hearing loss, or a combination of these or other factors. The precaution and updated adverse reactions sections of the approved product labeling for Viagra, Levitra, and Cialis were revised. FDA is working with the manufacturer to revise the labeling for Revatio. The complete MedWatch 2007 Safety Summary, including a link to the drug information page and revised prescribing information for Viagra, Levitra, and Cialis, is available online.
Meningitis Risk with Cochlear Implants
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) informed health care professionals and consumers that cochlear implants have been associated with an increased risk of bacterial meningitis caused by streptococcus pneumoniae. Children who received a cochlear implant with a positioner component are at a greater risk. The positioner was withdrawn from the market in July 2002. There were two deaths from meningitis within the past year in children, ages 9 and 11, who received a cochlear implant with the positioner. Neither child was fully vaccinated; one child died because of the lack of vaccination.
The FDA reminds health care professionals and consumers that cochlear implant recipients must be fully immunized according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) vaccination recommendations. Because children with cochlear implants are at increased risk for pneumococcal meningitis, CDC recommends that they receive pneumococcal vaccination under the same schedules that apply to other individuals at high risk for invasive pneumococcal disease. The complete MedWatch 2007 Safety Summary, including a link to the Public Health Notification and Advice for Patients documents, is available online.
Montclair Doctoral Program Granted Accreditation
The doctoral program in audiology at Montclair State University has been granted accreditation by ASHA’s Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology (CAA).This accreditation makes Montclair State the only university in New Jersey to offer a doctoral degree in audiology and one of just 74 universities in the country with such a program.
The audiology program, established at Montclair State in 2005, includes students preparing to enter clinical practice, focusing on academic research, and already in the profession and seeking to upgrade from a master’s degree to a doctorate. Visit Montclair State’s Web site for more information.
Fossil Shows Traces of First Modern Ears
The first backboned creatures to conquer land were deaf, lacking the tiny bones in the middle ear needed to transmit sound. Advanced hearing was assumed to have evolved shortly before the emergence of dinosaurs, roughly 200 million years ago.
Near the Mezen River in central Russia, paleobiologists have uncovered weasel-sized prehistoric reptiles, called parareptiles, which possessed the first modern earsСperhaps the first specialized trait for living in the darkС60 million years ago.
The outside of the cheek in the reptiles was covered with a large eardrum. This structure was connected with the inner ear and the brain with a bone comparable to those in human ears. The scientists estimate the reptiles of the Permian priodСat least six species that reached roughly 1.5 feet in lengthСwere able to hear at least as well as modern lizards, according to researcher Johannes Mueller, a vertebrate paleontologist at Humboldt University in Berlin.
The comparatively large eye sockets found in the new fossils, another feature typical of vertebrates living in the dark, also suggest these reptiles might have been among the first backboned land creatures to pursue a nocturnal lifestyle.
These reptiles are part of a completely extinct lineage distantly related to turtles, lizards, snakes, crocodiles, birds and dinosaurs. The advanced ears of today are thought to have evolved mostly independently of each other, Mueller explained. Mueller and colleague Linda Tsuji detailed their findings online Sept. 12 in the journal PLoS ONE.
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November 2007
Volume 12, Issue 16