Audiology in Brief The International Commission on Biological Effects of Noise (ICBEN) will, for the first time in 40 years, hold its week-long “International Congress on Noise as a Public Health Problem” in the United States. The Congress, which is held every five years and draws 500–600 participants from many countries, will ... News in Brief
Free
News in Brief  |   January 01, 2008
Audiology in Brief
Author Notes
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   January 01, 2008
Audiology in Brief
The ASHA Leader, January 2008, Vol. 13, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.13012008.5
The ASHA Leader, January 2008, Vol. 13, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.13012008.5
2008 International Noise Congress
The International Commission on Biological Effects of Noise (ICBEN) will, for the first time in 40 years, hold its week-long “International Congress on Noise as a Public Health Problem” in the United States. The Congress, which is held every five years and draws 500–600 participants from many countries, will convene July 21–25 at Foxwoods Resort in Mashantucket, Conn. The first Congress, in 1968, was funded primarily by ASHA and held in Washington, D.C.
ICBEN provides an assembly point for noise researchers, government agencies, and concerned businesses and industries. The Congresses feature participation by and discussions among scientists, clinicians, engineers, industry leaders, and national and international government representatives on such diverse areas as hearing, physics, speech perception, psychology, biophysics, biochemistry, sociology, physiology, medicine, architecture, education, and public and industrial health.
The deadline for abstracts is Feb. 1. For more information, including a preliminary agenda, facts about the Congress and its parent organization, registration information andКfrequently asked questions, e-mail icben2008@sbcglobal.net.
India to Develop Low-Cost Cochlear Implant
The Naval Science & Technological Laboratory (NSTL) in Vishakapatnam, India, which normally produces weapons for the Navy, will focus research and development efforts on a low-cost cochlear implant.
The NSTL initiative will bring the device to market in India for 1.5 lakh rupees, the equivalent of about $3,700—a fraction of the $45,000 cost of the device in the United States, a fee that includes the device, hospitalization, and surgery.
According to NSTL director and acoustics scientist V. Bhujanga Rao, animal research on the device has yielded good results, and India may be the first country to produce a low-cost cochlear implant.
“In India there are more than one million people who have hearing loss that cannot be repaired,” he said. “The CI facility available in a few nations is high-priced. As an acoustics scientist, I want to develop an indigenous low-cost device.”
After the completion of this project, NSTL is contemplating the development of a bionic eye project in the near future, Rao said. Visit the New Wind Press for more information.
Congressman Uses Tinnitus Device
Rep. Tom Tancredo (R-Colorado) wasn’t turning a deaf ear to his GOP presidential campaign adviser when he was spotted in early December wearing what appeared to be headphones—he actually was trying to focus on the conversation.
Although Tancredo looked like he might have been trying to listen to a football game or an audiobook instead of listening to his dining companion, he was in fact using a medical device for tinnitus relief. The device is available by prescription and is customized for the user’s audiological profile and works by delivering precisely designed music embedded with a pleasant acoustic neural stimulus through headphones to the listener.
The device helps Tancredo’s hearing, according to spokesman T.Q. Houlton, who says the device also has another convenient sound-blocking use. “It has another setting that blocks out the voices of staffers,” Houlton jokes in an article in the Dec. 4, 2007, issue of Roll Call.
0 Comments
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment
Name
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account ×
FROM THIS ISSUE
January 2008
Volume 13, Issue 1