Audiology in Brief Diabetes is an independent risk factor for hearing loss, according to an Annals of Internal Medicine report posted online. The report was announced by Physician’s First Watch. Researchers analyzed data collected from 1999 to 2004 by the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The analysis was limited to approximately ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   August 01, 2008
Audiology in Brief
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Hearing Disorders / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   August 01, 2008
Audiology in Brief
The ASHA Leader, August 2008, Vol. 13, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.13102008.5
The ASHA Leader, August 2008, Vol. 13, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.13102008.5
Diabetes and Hearing Loss Risk
Diabetes is an independent risk factor for hearing loss, according to an Annals of Internal Medicine report posted online. The report was announced by Physician’s First Watch.
Researchers analyzed data collected from 1999 to 2004 by the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The analysis was limited to approximately 5,100 adults who underwent audiometric testing and answered a questionnaire on diabetes. The researchers found age-adjusted hearing loss at all frequency ranges to be more prevalent among subjects who reported having diabetes.
The authors estimate a 21% prevalence of low- or mid-frequency hearing loss among individuals with diabetes (vs. 9% in those without diabetes), and speculate that changes to the microvasculature often found in diabetes may be the cause.
To read the full article, visit Annals of Internal Medicine or Journal Watch.
Audiology Funding Request for Military Personnel
A provision in the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2009 would establish a Center of Excellence in the prevention, diagnosis, mitigation, treatment, and rehabilitation of hearing loss and auditory system injuries. The center would ensure high-quality audiologic care, improve access to services, and create an advocacy network for military personnel with hearing loss and balance disorders.
A House Committee on Armed Services report called for accelerated Department of Defense efforts to address service members’ operational, health, and quality-of-life issues associated with exposure to high noise levels and blasts. The committee cited a study demonstrating the impact of war on hearing health: among military personnel exposed to blasts in Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom, more than 50% had significant hearing loss, 49% reported tinnitus, 3% experienced tympanic membrane perforation, 26% had ear pain, and 15% complained of dizziness.
ASHA is urging the Senate to include this provision, H.R. 5658, in final legislation. For more information, contact Ingrida Lusis, director of federal and political advocacy, at ilusis@asha.org or 202-624-5951.
Are Bilateral CIs More Effective?
Research by Bradford Bichey and Richard Miyamoto is the first to show evidence that bilateral cochlear implantation results in significant improvement in quality of life, a benefit that outweighs the cost of the second implant.
The study, in the May issue of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, found that when cochlear devices were present in both ears, factors that contribute to quality of life improved, including critical abilities such as hearing in noisy environments, focusing on conversations, and speaking at an appropriate volume. This study may be significant for individuals who want their health insurance providers to pay for bilateral rather than the standard single cochlear implants. To view the article, visit Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery online.
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August 2008
Volume 13, Issue 10