Audiology in Brief Can’t make it to convention? You can still learn about the latest developments in hearing aid technology from Ruth Bentler, professor in the Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology at the University of Iowa. Her convention workshop on innovations in directional microphones, digital noise reduction, micro-sized microphones, subliminal messaging, ... News in Brief
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News in Brief  |   November 01, 2008
Audiology in Brief
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Hearing Disorders / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   November 01, 2008
Audiology in Brief
The ASHA Leader, November 2008, Vol. 13, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.13152008.5
The ASHA Leader, November 2008, Vol. 13, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.13152008.5
Live From the ASHA Convention
Can’t make it to convention? You can still learn about the latest developments in hearing aid technology from Ruth Bentler, professor in the Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology at the University of Iowa. Her convention workshop on innovations in directional microphones, digital noise reduction, micro-sized microphones, subliminal messaging, and more will be broadcast live on the Internet on Friday, Nov. 21, 2–3 p.m. EST. The deadline for registration for the live event is Nov. 20; a replay will also be available on demand for one year, through Nov. 21, 2009. Either option is available for 0.1 ASHA CEUs. For more information, go to the ASHA online store or call 888-498-6699.
New Relay Service Rules
People with hearing loss or speech disorders who use Video Relay Service (VRS) or Internet Protocol Relay (IP-Relay)—two forms of Internet-based telecommunications relay services (TRS)—will be able to obtain 10-digit telephone numbers beginning Dec. 31. This regulation was adopted by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in conjunction with 911 call-handling requirements for VRS and IP-Relay providers.
TRS calls made through the traditional telephone network automatically pass along signals that help identify the caller’s location to the called party. As a result, relay providers will know the caller’s location, and can route the call to the appropriate emergency personnel to respond. This routing is not possible with the Internet-based forms of TRS because calls do not pass along location information. The FCC has now adopted rules to address this situation by requiring VRS and IP-Relay providers to obtain location information from relay users who have 10-digit telephone numbers. The new rules ensure that VRS and IP-Relay users are provided 911 service comparable to that provided to traditional telephone users.
Hearing Loss Prevalence
Hearing loss among American adults may be more common than previously reported, according to findings in the July 28 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine.
The researchers evaluated 1999–2004 survey data from 5,742 people ages 20–69. From 2003 to 2004, 16.1% (an estimated 29 million) of American adults had hearing loss in the speech frequencies in one ear (8.9%) or both ears (7.3%), and 31% (an estimated 55 billion) had high-frequency hearing loss—12% in one ear and 19% in both ears, according to the study.
Hearing loss, particularly in high frequencies, was identified in 8.5% of people ages 20–29 and in 17% of people ages 30–39. Men were 5.5 times more likely than women to have hearing loss. White and Mexican-American men had the highest rates of high-frequency and bilateral hearing losses. African Americans were 70% less likely than whites to have hearing loss.
“Increases in hearing loss prevalence occurred earlier among participants with smoking, noise exposure, and cardiovascular risks,” wrote otolaryngologist Yuri Agrawal, who led the study with colleagues at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore.
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November 2008
Volume 13, Issue 15