Schools Will Not Lose Federal Funds in 2012–2013 Educators are breathing a sigh of relief that funds for the 2012–2013 school year will not take a hit if forced spending reductions take effect at the start of 2013. The reprieve is short-lived, however, as Department of Education officials have indicated that forced budget cuts would come from 2013–2014 ... Policy Analysis
Free
Policy Analysis  |   August 01, 2012
Schools Will Not Lose Federal Funds in 2012–2013
Author Notes
  • Neil Snyder, director of federal advocacy, can be reached at nsnyder@asha.org.
    Neil Snyder, director of federal advocacy, can be reached at nsnyder@asha.org.×
Article Information
Regulatory, Legislative & Advocacy / Policy Analysis
Policy Analysis   |   August 01, 2012
Schools Will Not Lose Federal Funds in 2012–2013
The ASHA Leader, August 2012, Vol. 17, 2. doi:10.1044/leader.PA1.17102012.2
The ASHA Leader, August 2012, Vol. 17, 2. doi:10.1044/leader.PA1.17102012.2
Educators are breathing a sigh of relief that funds for the 2012–2013 school year will not take a hit if forced spending reductions take effect at the start of 2013.
The reprieve is short-lived, however, as Department of Education officials have indicated that forced budget cuts would come from 2013–2014 school year appropriations.
The 2011 Deficit Control Act requires Congress and President Obama to agree on ways to reduce the federal deficit. Because an agreement has not been reached, automatic spending cuts of at least 7.8% to all federal programs will take effect Jan. 2, 2013—a process known as sequestration (The ASHA Leader, July 31).
A July 20 memo from Anthony Miller, deputy education secretary, indicates “there is no reason to believe that a sequestration would affect funding for the 2012–13 school year.” This communication is the first official explanation from the Department of Education on its plans to implement the automatic spending cuts.
The law gives the Office of Management and Budget wide latitude on how to implement the spending cuts. Because the school year does not coincide with the federal fiscal year, it would be difficult to make cuts to education programs four months (or more) into the school year.
Therefore, although sequestration would trigger cuts on Jan. 3, 2012, education funding (through the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act, Elementary and Secondary Education Act, and Career and Technical Education Program) would not be affected until payments are sent to states and districts on July 1, 2013, for the 2013–2014 school year.
Funding for the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, for example, will be reduced by approximately $972.5 million for that school year, $243 million of which would come from related services, including speech-language and hearing.
Officials identified one exception to the reprieve—the Impact Aid program, which assists school districts serving large federal military facilities. These tax-exempt facilities limit the ability of local jurisdictions to raise sufficient tax money to support schools.
Miller’s memo also states that, “based upon past practice in [federal] appropriations, there is little reason to delay hiring for school year 2012–12 due to the threat of sequestration.”
0 Comments
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment
Name
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account ×
FROM THIS ISSUE
August 2012
Volume 17, Issue 10