Meet ASHA’s Four New Board Members President-Elect Elizabeth McCrea’s four-decade professional career—across service delivery and academic settings—has included didactic, clinical, and administrative responsibilities. She has been involved with ASHA’s committees and boards for 25 years. “These experiences have helped me appreciate and celebrate the work of individual members, as well as that of ASHA,” she ... ASHA News
Free
ASHA News  |   July 01, 2012
Meet ASHA’s Four New Board Members
Author Notes
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / ASHA News & Member Stories / ASHA News
ASHA News   |   July 01, 2012
Meet ASHA’s Four New Board Members
The ASHA Leader, July 2012, Vol. 17, 8-9. doi:10.1044/leader.AN1.17092012.8
The ASHA Leader, July 2012, Vol. 17, 8-9. doi:10.1044/leader.AN1.17092012.8
Elizabeth McCrea, PhD, CCC-SLP
President-Elect
Elizabeth McCrea’s four-decade professional career—across service delivery and academic settings—has included didactic, clinical, and administrative responsibilities. She has been involved with ASHA’s committees and boards for 25 years. “These experiences have helped me appreciate and celebrate the work of individual members, as well as that of ASHA,” she said. “I understand how ASHA works to support the professions in our shared mission of making communication achievable for everyone.”
McCrea, a clinical professor emerita of the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences at Indiana University, recognizes that one of ASHA’s primary strengths is its 150,000 members. She looks forward to hearing members’ perspectives on the association’s and professions’ ongoing and diverse challenges and members’ priorities for addressing them: health care reform, education policies, reimbursement issues, expanding the professions’ scope of practice and its influence on academic preparation and clinical education, data to validate professional practices and outcomes, support for expanded research and efforts to translate the results into practice, strategic liaisons across allied professions, and accessible, competent, and ethical service delivery in a time of growing linguistic and cultural diversity.
The challenges of serving as ASHA president are legion, but McCrea says she has developed leadership skills to meet them. She prefers to gather information and develop a structure in which the information and the issue can be shared, defined, and developed by all participants. “I tend to listen more than I talk,” she said, “and view my role as that of a facilitator. I encourage everyone to express their point of view, while keeping the issue moving forward toward a collaborative and appropriate conclusion, which is then directly communicated and implemented.”
Shari Robertson, PhD, CCC-SLP
Vice President for Academic Affairs
Shari Robertson has a vision: “A culture of communication and collaboration in which all members of ASHA’s academic community feel connected, valued, and inspired to work together to find solutions that will protect the integrity of our profession and ensure clinical excellence for current and future clients.”
Robertson, professor and dean’s associate at Indiana University of Pennsylvania (IUP), has experienced the profession from diverse perspectives—as student, school-based clinician, special education supervisor, university professor, administrator, and businesswoman. Because of this 35-year “professional mosaic,” she can “consider a problem from multiple viewpoints, develop potential solutions, make decisions, set meaningful goals, and roll up my sleeves and make it happen.” As the dean’s associate in the IUP graduate school, she is responsible for quality control of all university graduate curricula, while teaching undergraduate and graduate courses and maintaining her own scholarly agenda.
Robertson views the shortage of adequately trained and appropriately credentialed professionals as a persistent, growing, and serious challenge that can lead to encroachment by those not adequately trained to provide evidence-based intervention, or to “lowering the bar” in professional academic preparation. The problem is exacerbated by the shrinking pool of PhDs to train new professionals. She is committed to finding innovative ways to reverse the negative replacement ratio without sacrificing academic rigor.
“The most effective leaders provide the motivation, the tools, and the vision,” she said, “and work collaboratively and as hard as they can to achieve common goals.” Robertson strives to treat others as she would like to be treated—with full attention, genuine respect, no hidden agendas, and an unwavering belief that “together we can make a difference.”
Donna Fisher Smiley, PhD, CCC-A
Vice President for Audiology Practice
Donna Fisher Smiley wants nothing less than a “re-branding” of the profession of audiology. “I want audiologists to be seen as the go-to professionals for hearing health care,” she said. “As the field becomes more technologically advanced, equipment-oriented, and evidence-based, we don’t want to lose the passion for people and empathy” that has always defined audiologists. She wants consumers to see a clinician not merely as “the person who diagnosed the hearing loss,” but as an audiologist committed to helping them hear and communicate better every day.
During her 22 years of experience, Smiley has worked in numerous settings—clinical, academic, private practice, and schools—and is now coordinator of educational audiology/speech pathology resources for the Arkansas Children’s Hospital Schools Program. “These experiences gave me a broad understanding of the issues and challenges facing the field of audiology,” she said. “Because my primary clinical expertise is pediatric audiology, I have always worked closely with speech-language pathologists and other professionals. I believe these collaborative relationships will have a positive impact in my work on the ASHA Board.”
Smiley sees the need for audiologists to be seen as primary providers of hearing health care, and the need to increase understanding of the value of the work of audiologists in all practice settings as the most important issues facing the profession of audiology. “What we do matters, and it has value,” she said. “In some cases, we have not emphasized the value of our work. We convey the message that a hearing evaluation has no value—we give them away to attract customers for hearing aid sales. We need to work together to improve public valuation of our services.”
Howard Goldstein, PhD, CCC-SLP
Vice President for Science and Research
Howard Goldstein looks forward to encouraging ASHA members to advocate for research to advance the practice of speech-language pathology and audiology. “We represent a discipline truly invested in using research as a foundation to our clinical practice,” he said. “If we embrace this scientific perspective and promote this attitude, I think we can elevate our status as a profession.” And all members—not just researchers—can play a part as consumers, promoters, advocates, doers, and collaborators. “I want all ASHA members to feel a part of this larger perspective on research involvement,” he said.
Goldstein also recognizes and celebrates the contributions of good science from many fields. He directs the International Poverty Solutions Collaborative, serves as professor of human development and family sciences at The Ohio State University, and has been a passionate advocate for and practitioner of research—particularly clinical efficacy research—for more than 30 years. During that time, he was supported by various federal agencies in pursuit of interventions to teach generative language, social communication, and early language and literacy skills to children with, or at risk for, developmental disabilities. “We need to attract broad support,” Goldstein said, “to ensure that enough high-quality professionals are available to ensure all people can learn and maintain effective communication skills—and fulfill their life potential.”
Goldstein believes that “We live in challenging times, amidst rapid changes characterized by heightening expectations, shrinking funding, and soaring societal needs. We cannot lose sight of the fact that the discipline of communication sciences and disorders plays a critical role in helping people communicate, the most fundamental feature of the human condition.”
In Touch

Contact members of the Board of Directors with your feedback, professional issues, concerns, and commendations. Go to the online “In Touch” form. All submissions will receive a timely response.

0 Comments
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment
Name
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account ×
FROM THIS ISSUE
July 2012
Volume 17, Issue 9