HLAA on hi HealthInnovations The Hearing Loss Association of America’s (HLAA) view on United Healthcare’s unorthodox approach to increasing hearing loss treatment has been considerably oversimplified and, therefore, greatly misconstrued by a number of organizations representing audiologists and hearing aid companies (The ASHA Leader, April 24). A vital source of patient advocacy and support, ... Inbox
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Inbox  |   June 01, 2012
HLAA on hi HealthInnovations
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Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / ASHA News & Member Stories / Inbox
Inbox   |   June 01, 2012
HLAA on hi HealthInnovations
The ASHA Leader, June 2012, Vol. 17, 2. doi:10.1044/leader.IN1.17072012.2
The ASHA Leader, June 2012, Vol. 17, 2. doi:10.1044/leader.IN1.17072012.2
The Hearing Loss Association of America’s (HLAA) view on United Healthcare’s unorthodox approach to increasing hearing loss treatment has been considerably oversimplified and, therefore, greatly misconstrued by a number of organizations representing audiologists and hearing aid companies (The ASHA Leader, April 24).
A vital source of patient advocacy and support, HLAA provides essential nontechnical therapies and educational programs that are commonly minimized or eliminated from treatment due to time and financial constraints of practicing audiologists. It is therefore essential that HLAA’s position be accurately represented.
Two positions seem to be reported on the controversial hi HealthInnovations: A group is either in clear opposition to the program or comes out in wholehearted support of it. Rather, HLAA’s position has been to defer opposition to create ground for examination of urgently needed alternatives for affordable treatment. The fact that HLAA is frequently contacted by persons searching for ways to pay for amplification adds credence to findings indicated by the Marke Trak surveys that the financial demands of hearing aids greatly complicate the patient’s decision to proceed with treatment and contribute to treatment rates that remain staggeringly low.
The subtle, yet crucial, difference between HLAA’s stance and unqualified support is clearly reflected in HLAA’s position statements and articles, and in the balanced range of its 2012 convention seminars on hearing aid purchases, planned to help patients frame well-informed questions that will lead to the best possible communication outcomes.
I hope that you will encourage ASHA members to become familiar with HLAA’s position.
Peggy Ellertsen Newton, Massachusetts
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June 2012
Volume 17, Issue 7