Why Interprofessional Education Matters In interprofessional education (IPE), two or more professions learn about, from, and with each other to improve health outcomes for patients. The World Health Organization (WHO) promotes IPE and collaborative practice, as does ASHA. ASHA supports and facilitates member engagement in IPE in academic programs (as demonstrated in the University ... Feature sidebar
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Feature sidebar  |   May 01, 2012
Why Interprofessional Education Matters
Author Notes
  • Lemmietta McNeilly, PhD, CCC-SLP, ASHA Chief Staff Officer for Speech-Language Pathology
    Lemmietta McNeilly, PhD, CCC-SLP, ASHA Chief Staff Officer for Speech-Language Pathology×
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Professional Issues & Training / Features
Feature sidebar   |   May 01, 2012
Why Interprofessional Education Matters
The ASHA Leader, May 2012, Vol. 17, 24. doi:10.1044/leader.FTR3sb.17062012.24
The ASHA Leader, May 2012, Vol. 17, 24. doi:10.1044/leader.FTR3sb.17062012.24
In interprofessional education (IPE), two or more professions learn about, from, and with each other to improve health outcomes for patients. The World Health Organization (WHO) promotes IPE and collaborative practice, as does ASHA.
ASHA supports and facilitates member engagement in IPE in academic programs (as demonstrated in the University of Kentucky program), clinical service, clinical research, and professional development. Making collaborative learning a part of classrooms and on-campus clinical environments equips clinicians to help improve the functional outcomes of those who receive rehabilitative services for communication disorders.
WHO also supports the role of global health organizations in IPE, which are increasingly influencing health policy. In accordance with these WHO priorities, the ASHA Board of Directors has developed the following IPE-related association action items:
  • Develop a white paper describing the role and involvement of audiologists and speech-language pathologists in IPE.

  • Facilitate a survey of needs regarding competency and plan educational offerings based on the results.

  • Collaborate with the Council on Academic Programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders on IPE for academic programs.

  • Consider an IPE track at the ASHA convention, and encourage participation from other disciplines.

  • Develop a long-range plan that includes IPE in academic preparation, clinical practice, and continuing education.

  • Consider IPE as a topic of discussion at ASHA researcher-academic town meetings.

  • Pursue funding to develop materials and resources.

  • Work with other health care organizations such as the American Occupational Therapy Association and the American Physical Therapy Association, and engage with other organizations representing professions that have participated in IPE (e.g., nursing, dentistry, pharmacy, and medicine).

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FROM THIS ISSUE
May 2012
Volume 17, Issue 6