Watching in Wonder When I learned that my friend KC was receiving speech-language services following a brain hemorrhage, all my helper buttons were pushed. What side of the brain was involved? What were her communication problems? And most important, who was her speech-language pathologist? Judy Stone-Goldman (left) and Megan Caldwell I know ... First Person on the Last Page
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First Person on the Last Page  |   May 01, 2012
Watching in Wonder
Author Notes
  • Judy Stone-Goldman, SLP-CCC, is an emerita senior lecturer at the University of Washington. Contact her at jsg@thereflectivewriter.com.
    Judy Stone-Goldman, SLP-CCC, is an emerita senior lecturer at the University of Washington. Contact her at jsg@thereflectivewriter.com.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / ASHA News & Member Stories / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / First Person on the Last Page
First Person on the Last Page   |   May 01, 2012
Watching in Wonder
The ASHA Leader, May 2012, Vol. 17, 39. doi:10.1044/leader.FPLP.17062012.39
The ASHA Leader, May 2012, Vol. 17, 39. doi:10.1044/leader.FPLP.17062012.39
When I learned that my friend KC was receiving speech-language services following a brain hemorrhage, all my helper buttons were pushed. What side of the brain was involved? What were her communication problems? And most important, who was her speech-language pathologist?
Judy Stone-Goldman (left) and Megan Caldwell
I know a lot of SLPs in town. In 20 years of teaching in the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences at the University of Washington, I observed countless sessions, wrote reams of feedback, and saw the best and worst of SLPs-in-training. So I couldn’t help but be interested in (and concerned about) who was helping my friend.
Suffering memory problems, KC remembered only the first name of her SLP: Megan. But that was enough. I remembered Megan Caldwell as a wonderful student, and I even remembered my disappointment when I learned she was planning to work with adults rather than children, who were my focus.
Today, as I watch the session from a corner of the room, I am grateful she made that decision. I see her guide KC in a fluid treatment session—discussion, exploration, decision making, support—all woven together to help KC deal with the effects of a frontal head injury and right-side brain hemorrhage. This session is a long way from the structured, speech-focused pediatric sessions Megan and I once worked on together.
What a pleasure it is to watch this session—to witness Megan as the professional she has become and to see how capably and compassionately she cares for my friend.
I feel relief as I realize that Megan knows a great deal more than I do about what KC needs.
I am no longer Megan’s supervisor, but if I were, I would write on her feedback form: Great session (and I learned a lot)! You don’t need me now, but I’m so glad you’re here.
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May 2012
Volume 17, Issue 6