Clinicians Turn to Twitter to Connect and Share Expertise Think Twitter is just about what people ate for lunch? Not anymore. Twitter, a “microblogging” service featuring “tweets” of up to 140 characters, was created in 2006 so that small groups could use short message service (SMS) to answer the question “what are you doing?” (hence the infamous “I’m eating ... Get Social
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Get Social  |   November 01, 2011
Clinicians Turn to Twitter to Connect and Share Expertise
Author Notes
  • Maggie McGary, social media director, can be reached at mmcgary@asha.org.
    Maggie McGary, social media director, can be reached at mmcgary@asha.org.×
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Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Get Social
Get Social   |   November 01, 2011
Clinicians Turn to Twitter to Connect and Share Expertise
The ASHA Leader, November 2011, Vol. 16, online only. doi:10.1044/leader.GS.16142011.np
The ASHA Leader, November 2011, Vol. 16, online only. doi:10.1044/leader.GS.16142011.np
Think Twitter is just about what people ate for lunch? Not anymore. Twitter, a “microblogging” service featuring “tweets” of up to 140 characters, was created in 2006 so that small groups could use short message service (SMS) to answer the question “what are you doing?” (hence the infamous “I’m eating a sandwich”-type tweets).
Since then, the service has signed up 100 million active users (more than half of whom log in daily) and morphed into a community-building tool for people with similar interests and careers. Many health care professionals, including speech-language pathologists and audiologists, find Twitter an easy, quick way to exchange information and connect with millions of people across the globe about any issue.
A health care consulting group, The Fox Group, has developed the Healthcare Hashtag project to make Twitter more accessible for health care providers and the health care community as a whole. “Hashtag” refers to the way tweets are tagged to make them searchable by subject; the pound sign (#) plus a short tag such as “SLPeeps,” for example, is the way SLPs tag their tweets to make them easily searchable by other SLPs.
SLPs are actively using Twitter to communicate with one another—so actively, in fact, that in September #SLPeeps was the second-most-viewed hashtag in Healthcare Hashtags. How many SLPs are using Twitter? In the month of October alone, 2,968 tweets by 666 “tweeters” included the #SLPeeps hashtag. Tanya Coyle, a Canadian SLP and social media enthusiast, has compiled a public Twitter list of #SLPeeps that people can follow (select “follow this list”). She recently shared on Twitter that her original list has maxed out at 500 people. She plans to create a new list soon to continue to make it easy for SLPs to find one another on Twitter.
Interested in learning more about how SLPs are using Twitter? Coyle recently wrote a post about the #SLPeeps on ASHAsphere or you can follow her on Twitter and ask her yourself. Happy tweeting!
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FROM THIS ISSUE
November 2011
Volume 16, Issue 14