Apps at Work: ASHA Members Share Their Tech Tips Tablets and smartphones, apps and downloads—gadgetry to aid communication interventions just keeps growing.The ASHA Leaderasked members, via Facebook and LinkedIn, what tech tools they find most helpful. Here are some highlights: I’m doing some work in a skilled nursing facility. A few weeks ago, I had an elderly Vietnamese-speaking ... App-titude
Free
App-titude  |   October 01, 2011
Apps at Work: ASHA Members Share Their Tech Tips
Author Notes
Article Information
Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / ASHA News & Member Stories / App-titude
App-titude   |   October 01, 2011
Apps at Work: ASHA Members Share Their Tech Tips
The ASHA Leader, October 2011, Vol. 16, 21. doi:10.1044/leader.APP.16122011.21
The ASHA Leader, October 2011, Vol. 16, 21. doi:10.1044/leader.APP.16122011.21
Tablets and smartphones, apps and downloads—gadgetry to aid communication interventions just keeps growing.The ASHA Leaderasked members, via Facebook and LinkedIn, what tech tools they find most helpful. Here are some highlights:
I’m doing some work in a skilled nursing facility. A few weeks ago, I had an elderly Vietnamese-speaking woman with aphasia. I don’t know enough Vietnamese to do any sort of assessment or treatment and her family was less than helpful. Enter YouTube.
I found several educational videos on the alphabet, days of the week, and numbers, which at least gave me an idea of her automatics. Then I found one on learning colors. It showed the colors, foods, etc., and then labeled the objects. I paused the video, let her name the object, and then we both found out if it was correct once I started the video. I was able to get a better understanding of the patient’s aphasia and some helpful treatment strategies, and was able to give the family members some suggestions for ways to help their mom.
—Jena Casbon, MS, CCC-SLP (via LinkedIn)
I use an iPod Touch for daily note documentation. The iPod syncs with our servers and our notes—which are integrated with our electronic medical records—are uploaded throughout the day. I work with adults and find the device most helpful for dysphagia patients to keep track of frequency of exercises, and for trach patients to keep track of cuff deflation and speaking valve tolerance, along with tracking the ability to vocalize, whether it’s for sustained phonation or increasing utterance length per breath. I find it difficult to document during cognitive treatment because more one-on-one attention is needed. Currently, we use the iPods only for documentation, as content (i.e., apps) is controlled by the IT department and we have very limited ability to download apps that can be used in conjunction with therapy. Hopefully this will change as we move forward with mobile tech.
—Adam Slota, MA, CCC-SLP (via Facebook)
I use the voice memo feature of my iPhone for recordings. I work with children, and they love recording their best work, knowing I’ll e-mail the voice memo to their parents, whether it is articulation, narratives, or fluency practice. SuperDuper also has a great data-tracking app. After each session, I quickly provide feedback to parents by e-mailing the results of the session using this app.
Jennifer Stuart, MA, ME, CCC-SLP (via Facebook)
I use iPads, iPhone, and an iTouch in both my school setting and private practice. There are so many apps that can be used in treatment and not all were developed specifically for that. Book apps are easy to use for vocabulary, comprehension, and more. The interactive parts of many book apps make them fun and engaging. I use articulation apps, which can even keep data. The list of uses of this technology is as long as your imagination.
—Cindy L. Meester, MS, CCC-SLP (via LinkedIn)
I had a 31-year-old male client with severe aphasia. He wouldn’t look at picture boards, but used an iPod Touch to record himself singing the national anthem, photograph his friends on a weekend pass (great conversation material), request his favorite foods, talk about his therapists, and listen to his music. He used Comprehension TherAppy to practice single-word comprehension and SmallTalk Phonemes to practice his speech. He also enjoyed playing the game apps to strengthen his cognitive skills and alleviate boredom. Leave his AAC at home in a forgotten corner? This guy was inseparable from his “cool” device and had communication, therapy, and entertainment at hand at all times.
—Megan Sutton, MS, CCC-SLP (via LinkedIn)
See Who’s Talking

…on LinkedIn and Facebook. Share tips and tricks with other clinicians, discuss your practice, and network with professionals all over the world. We may ask to publish your comments in a future issue of The ASHA Leader or the ASHA Leader Online!

0 Comments
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment
Name
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account ×
FROM THIS ISSUE
October 2011
Volume 16, Issue 12