Early Intervention: Research Trends Although the primary purpose of augmented language is to help a child communicate, it also can have a positive effect on a parent’s perception of language development. Researchers selected 53 parents of toddlers who had developmental delays and fewer than 10 words. The parents completed the Parent Perception of ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   September 01, 2011
Early Intervention: Research Trends
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Special Populations / Early Identification & Intervention / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   September 01, 2011
Early Intervention: Research Trends
The ASHA Leader, September 2011, Vol. 16, 20-21. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB.16112011.20
The ASHA Leader, September 2011, Vol. 16, 20-21. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB.16112011.20
Parent Perceptions of Toddlers With Developmental Delay
Although the primary purpose of augmented language is to help a child communicate, it also can have a positive effect on a parent’s perception of language development. Researchers selected 53 parents of toddlers who had developmental delays and fewer than 10 words. The parents completed the Parent Perception of Language Development before and after the children were randomly assigned to a language intervention. Two interventions focused on augmented communication with a speech-generating device, and one focused exclusively on speech.
The results showed that after intervention, the parents’ perceptions of success became more positive. Their perceptions of the severity of the child’s language difficulties decreased for the augmented interventions but increased for the spoken intervention. Child outcome correlated positively with success and negatively with difficulty, but only the correlation between number of spoken words and difficulty was statistically significant. The full study appears in the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology(search “Romski”).
Language Abilities of Children Who Stutter
A meta-analytic review of 22 studies that looked at childhood stuttering suggests that children’s language abilities are potentially influential variables associated with childhood stuttering. (A meta-analysis synthesizes and analyzes the numerical results from a number of studies that all address related research hypotheses.) Researchers identified studies through electronic databases, the tables of contents of speech-language journals, and reference lists of relevant articles and literature reviews. The 22 studies included in the review examined children ages 2–8 who do and do not stutter and reported norm-referenced language measures and/or measures from spontaneous language samples amenable to effect size calculation. Data were extracted using a coding manual and assessed via general and specialized analytical software.
Findings indicated that children who stutter scored significantly lower than children who did not stutter on norm-referenced measures of overall language (Hedges’ g=–0.48), receptive vocabulary (Hedges’ g=–0.52), and expressive vocabulary (Hedges’ g=–0.41), and mean length of utterance (Hedges’ g=–0.23). The full article appears in the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology (search “Ntourou”).
Internationally Adopted Children and Language Acquisition
Newly adopted children who show delays on prelinguistic and vocabulary comprehension measures are highly likely to continue to have slow language development at age 2 and may be candidates for early intervention, according to a recent study.
Researchers followed 27 children between 11 and 23 months of age adopted from Eastern Europe for a year following adoption. Local norms were used to develop early intervention guidelines that were evaluated against outcomes at age 2. Patterns of language emergence were also analyzed. Results from initial assessments using the Communication and Symbolic Behavior Scales-Developmental Profile (CSBS-DP) and MacArthur Communicative Development Inventory-Words and Gestures (MCDI-WG) were compared against speech and language outcomes one year later when the children were 2 years old.
The results showed that by age 2, receptive language and articulation were developing well, but expressive language was still emerging. Initial assessment using the CSBS–DP Behavior Sample and MCDI–WG Words Understood Developmental Quotient predicted age-2 language outcomes. Early-intervention guidelines based on these two measures had strong positive and negative likelihood ratios when using age-2 outcomes as the criteria (LR+ = 21.00; LR– = .00). Six of the children (22%) had slow language development in comparison to their peers. The full article appears in the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research (search “Scott meta-analysis”).
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September 2011
Volume 16, Issue 11