Administration Offers NCLB Relief States may seek liberation from some of the key mandates of the federal No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act under an Obama administration directive announced in the wake of Congressional inaction on NCLB reform and reauthorization. NCLB authorization expired in 2007, but it is extended automatically until a new law ... Policy Analysis
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Policy Analysis  |   September 01, 2011
Administration Offers NCLB Relief
Author Notes
  • Catherine D. Clarke, director of education and regulatory advocacy, can be reached at cclarke@asha.org or 800-498-2071, ext. 5611.
    Catherine D. Clarke, director of education and regulatory advocacy, can be reached at cclarke@asha.org or 800-498-2071, ext. 5611.×
Article Information
Regulatory, Legislative & Advocacy / Policy Analysis
Policy Analysis   |   September 01, 2011
Administration Offers NCLB Relief
The ASHA Leader, September 2011, Vol. 16, 3. doi:10.1044/leader.PA1.16112011.3
The ASHA Leader, September 2011, Vol. 16, 3. doi:10.1044/leader.PA1.16112011.3
States may seek liberation from some of the key mandates of the federal No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act under an Obama administration directive announced in the wake of Congressional inaction on NCLB reform and reauthorization.
NCLB authorization expired in 2007, but it is extended automatically until a new law is passed. The Obama administration submitted its NCLB proposal in March 2010; Congress has taken no action on it.
States that adopt standards that reflect the administration’s NCLB reform goals—which include preparing students for college and careers, robust use of data, and use of flexible and targeted accountability systems based on student growth—will be considered for waivers.
U.S. Department of Education officials have indicated that states say they cannot meet the requirements of the nine-year-old law, including 100% student proficiency in reading and math by 2014. States that fail to meet the requirements face sanctions, including loss of federal education funds.
In a blog post, Secretary of Education Arne Duncan indicated that “our job is to support reform that is good for students at the state and local level. We need to be tight on goals but loose on the means of achieving them—providing as much flexibility as possible, while maintaining meaningful accountability for improving student outcomes and closing achievement gaps.”
States do not, however, get “a pass on accountability,” Duncan wrote. “There will be a high bar for states seeking flexibility.”
For more information, visit the U.S. Department of Education’s website.
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September 2011
Volume 16, Issue 11