Leadership Program Debuts The day before the Schools Conference began on July 8 just outside Washington, D.C., 33 school-based speech-language pathologists attended a training session as part of their year-long journey of participation in ASHA’s Leadership Development Program (LDP). The program encourages participants to develop their leadership skills and give back to the ... School Matters
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School Matters  |   August 01, 2011
Leadership Program Debuts
Author Notes
  • Deborah Adamczyk Dixon, MA, CCC-SLP, director of school services, can be reached at ddixon@asha.org.
    Deborah Adamczyk Dixon, MA, CCC-SLP, director of school services, can be reached at ddixon@asha.org.×
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Professional Issues & Training / ASHA News & Member Stories / School Matters
School Matters   |   August 01, 2011
Leadership Program Debuts
The ASHA Leader, August 2011, Vol. 16, 23. doi:10.1044/leader.SCM.16102011.23
The ASHA Leader, August 2011, Vol. 16, 23. doi:10.1044/leader.SCM.16102011.23
The day before the Schools Conference began on July 8 just outside Washington, D.C., 33 school-based speech-language pathologists attended a training session as part of their year-long journey of participation in ASHA’s Leadership Development Program (LDP). The program encourages participants to develop their leadership skills and give back to the professions through volunteer service—with ASHA, in the workplace, or for a related professional organization.
Although the conference was the first gathering of the group, the selected participants had received assignments to complete before their arrival.
The LDP training session opened with warm welcomes and congratulations from ASHA leaders. Next, trainers Kevin Norris and Alice Waagen led group activities designed to enhance knowledge of emotional intelligence. All participants had taken an emotional intelligence assessment prior to the conference, and received their results at the training. In small groups, participants discussed how emotional intelligence can affect leadership.
As one participant said, “It is so useful to know how to deliver a clear vision—not just talking to someone’s head. Speaking to the person’s heart and life to evoke the emotions needed for the person to invest in that vision makes all the difference in creating a successful collaborative project.”
Participants spent the remainder of the day learning about project development and discussing their specific projects—for example, creating a statewide SLP handbook, developing a mentoring program for new SLPs, and developing a response to intervention program for secondary students—that they plan to complete by the end of the school year.
As the year unfolds, participants will continue to engage with one another during regular virtual team meetings and in webinars that will help them brainstorm and develop skills to complete their projects. Creativity and a sense of humor were evident in groups’ chosen team names: Team Crossroads, RTIers, E-formers, iChange, and The Green Tongues.
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FROM THIS ISSUE
August 2011
Volume 16, Issue 10