Student Mentoring Program Opens Communication sciences and disorders students and faculty are invited to apply to the 2011–2012 Student to Empowered Professional (S.T.E.P.) program, an online mentoring program for undergraduate, graduate, and doctoral students. Though all students are eligible, preference will be given to those students from racial/ethnic backgrounds that have been historically underrepresented ... ASHA News
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ASHA News  |   August 01, 2011
Student Mentoring Program Opens
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Professional Issues & Training / ASHA News
ASHA News   |   August 01, 2011
Student Mentoring Program Opens
The ASHA Leader, August 2011, Vol. 16, 46. doi:10.1044/leader.AN6.16102011.46
The ASHA Leader, August 2011, Vol. 16, 46. doi:10.1044/leader.AN6.16102011.46
Communication sciences and disorders students and faculty are invited to apply to the 2011–2012 Student to Empowered Professional (S.T.E.P.) program, an online mentoring program for undergraduate, graduate, and doctoral students.
Though all students are eligible, preference will be given to those students from racial/ethnic backgrounds that have been historically underrepresented in the communication sciences and disorders professions.
S.T.E.P. is designed to:
  • Connect self-motivated students with experienced mentors in meaningful, one-to-one mentoring relationships.

  • Support mentoring relationships through guided learning experiences.

  • Provide online resources for all students and mentors seeking tools, information, and inspiration.

  • Facilitate the continued recruitment and retention of students from racial/ethnic minority backgrounds.

S.T.E.P. allows mentoring pairs to connect with each other—and with the entire S.T.E.P. community—through Facebook, Twitter, and a listserve. Mentoring pairs are encouraged to establish open communication at the beginning of the partnership and must communicate at least twice a month.
Survey responses from students who participated in the 2010–2011 program were consistently positive. “[My mentor] was helpful, resourceful, and available,” one respondent wrote. “She helped me set goals and held me accountable to achieve them. Thank you for such a great program.”
Mentors often broaden their protégés’ perspective. As another participant wrote, “I enjoyed writing with my mentor, and I liked that we had the same views. She told me about a conference I had not known about in Puerto Rico. I am glad to know her and may even work with her as she is planning on moving to my state. Thank you for giving me that opportunity to meet a mentor outside of my university. Going to the same place for undergrad and graduate school makes my world a little limited in scope.”
Mentors’ guidance can also help students handle the barrage of graduate school requirements, as another participant learned. “Graduate school can be very competitive to get into. Once you’re in, there is a lot to focus on, from case studies to assessment and, yes, the Praxis. A mentor can’t do the work for you, but can offer expertise and input based on his or her experience. And students have a lot to share as well; they offer enthusiasm and excitement for the field of communication sciences and disorders.”
S.T.E.P. has a pool of qualified mentors ready to be matched with students and welcomes additional mentors as well.
Student and mentor enrollment is open through Sept. 15. To apply, visit the S.T.E.P. webpage.
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FROM THIS ISSUE
August 2011
Volume 16, Issue 10