State Leaders Highlight Successes, Challenges Laura Jo McKamey, the Montana representative to ASHA’s State Education Advocacy Leaders (SEALs), received the Nancy McKinley Leadership Award at the annual spring conference, May 19–21, of the Council of State Speech-Language-Hearing Association Presidents (CSAP) in Charleston, S.C. McKamey was recognized for coordinating an annual summer institute that provides continuing ... ASHA News
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ASHA News  |   August 01, 2011
State Leaders Highlight Successes, Challenges
Author Notes
  • Carol B. Fleming, MS, CCC-SLP, CSAP president, is a clinician at Pulaski Heights Middle School in Little Rock, Ark. She is a member of two ASHA special interest groups, Language Learning and Education (SIG 1) and School-Based Issues (SIG 16). Contact her at cbflem@swbell.net.
    Carol B. Fleming, MS, CCC-SLP, CSAP president, is a clinician at Pulaski Heights Middle School in Little Rock, Ark. She is a member of two ASHA special interest groups, Language Learning and Education (SIG 1) and School-Based Issues (SIG 16). Contact her at cbflem@swbell.net.×
  • Eileen Crowe, director of state association relations, can be reached at ecrowe@asha.org.
    Eileen Crowe, director of state association relations, can be reached at ecrowe@asha.org.×
Article Information
Practice Management / Professional Issues & Training / Regulatory, Legislative & Advocacy / ASHA News
ASHA News   |   August 01, 2011
State Leaders Highlight Successes, Challenges
The ASHA Leader, August 2011, Vol. 16, 36. doi:10.1044/leader.AN4.16102011.36
The ASHA Leader, August 2011, Vol. 16, 36. doi:10.1044/leader.AN4.16102011.36
Laura Jo McKamey, the Montana representative to ASHA’s State Education Advocacy Leaders (SEALs), received the Nancy McKinley Leadership Award at the annual spring conference, May 19–21, of the Council of State Speech-Language-Hearing Association Presidents (CSAP) in Charleston, S.C.
McKamey was recognized for coordinating an annual summer institute that provides continuing education opportunities for speech-language pathologists and audiologists and for her successful efforts to reinstate a communication sciences and disorders academic program in the state. Because of her diligence, the University of Montana recently graduated 31 SLPs.
Updates and Training
For the second year, CSAP sponsored the conference in collaboration with ASHA. It provided state and federal updates to participants, opportunities for networking with state association leaders, and leadership training. The conference opened with an ASHA-hosted reception Thursday evening that featured welcoming remarks from Paul Rao, ASHA president.
In Friday’s general sessions, Rao examined ASHA’s revised Code of Ethics; Robert Craven of Craven Management Associates presented on budget concerns of state associations; and Judith Keller, CSAP past president, focused on establishing and managing both a political action committee and a foundation.
Afternoon roundtable discussions revolved around licensure and state successes. New Mexico’s association, for example, sponsored a successful Better Hearing and Speech Month poster contest and book drive based on the theme “Read Between the Lines.”
ASHA Government Relations and Public Policy (GRPP) staff co-presented with Paulette Gentry, Tennessee SEAL, and Becky Cermak, Tennessee’s representative to ASHA’s State Medicare Administrative Contractor Network and State Advocates for Reimbursement Network, on the utilization of networks to advocate for the professions.
Advocacy
State leaders learned how to affect ASHA’s annual public policy agenda at a Saturday morning panel presentation, “Advocating for Legislative Change,” featuring GRPP staff and Tom Hallahan, ASHA vice president for government relations and public policy. They urged the state leaders to complete ASHA’s 2012 Public Policy Input Survey, which informs the development of the association’s policy agenda. Information about ASHA’s state outreach initiative and liaison plan was presented, as were advocacy efforts made on behalf of states.
State leaders from California, South Carolina, and Mississippi discussed advocacy efforts in their states on issues such as encroachment, licensure, telepractice, and Medicaid coverage of speech-language services.
ASHA convention staff offered tips on conducting annual conventions that make a profit for the state association and on negotiating hotel room blocks, catering, and speaker contracts.
During the “bring, brag, and moan” session, state leaders had the opportunity to highlight their successes and challenges. Many states reported success in grant funding, technology improvements related to updated websites and social media, and autism coverage mandates.
Common challenges included decrease in membership, lack of volunteers, recruitment/retention issues, Medicaid reimbursement issues, state-level budget issues, and licensure/credential challenges.
The conference also included a brief CSAP business meeting.
After the conference, participants took carriage rides, sponsored by the South Carolina Speech-Language-Hearing Association, through Charleston’s historic district. The carriage rides were followed by a “low country boil”—a traditional Georgia and South Carolina dish that includes sausage, shrimp, crab, potatoes and corn—in historic Marion Square.
For information on next year’s conference in Anchorage, Alaska, May 17–19, contact Molly Thompson, CSAP president-elect, at polarspeech@yahoo.com.
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August 2011
Volume 16, Issue 10