Debunking Generational Differences As the owner/director of a speech and hearing group practice, I was angered by the premise of the article “Generational Issues in Supervision and Administration” by Vicki McCready. It’s time to stop making excuses for unacceptable, bad behavior. As a parent of millennial children who majored in business, I believe ... Inbox
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Inbox  |   August 01, 2011
Debunking Generational Differences
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Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Practice Management / Professional Issues & Training / Inbox
Inbox   |   August 01, 2011
Debunking Generational Differences
The ASHA Leader, August 2011, Vol. 16, 2. doi:10.1044/leader.IN1.16082011.2
The ASHA Leader, August 2011, Vol. 16, 2. doi:10.1044/leader.IN1.16082011.2
As the owner/director of a speech and hearing group practice, I was angered by the premise of the article “Generational Issues in Supervision and Administration” by Vicki McCready. It’s time to stop making excuses for unacceptable, bad behavior. As a parent of millennial children who majored in business, I believe that so-called “misunderstandings” have more to do with the philosophical belief in many liberal arts schools that “everyone deserves a trophy.” Thus, I’ve had speech-language pathology graduates make unrealistic demands in pay for their lack of experience, interview for a pediatric caseload with a full-blown sibilant lisp, and give two weeks’ notice to replace their full-time caseload.
I believe the attitude of entitlement that I see from recent graduates has its roots at the university level. (How many university staff understand third-party reimbursements, overhead costs, and payroll taxes?) It may also be true that some parents promote spoiled children, but I don’t believe a sweeping generalization applies to all baby boomer parents. The bottom line is that most of us enter this profession to help people—not to get rich. And the state of reimbursements for speech and hearing services is changing for the worse—paying less for, and covering less of, what we do. The last thing we need are speech and hearing professionals out of touch with the fiscal realities that are unsubsidized, fee-for-service health care. And generational differences are no excuse.
Maura G. MarksMedfield, Massachusetts
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August 2011
Volume 16, Issue 8