Bilingualism I was thrilled to see Deborah Chitester’s comments on bilingualism (“First Person on the Last Page,” March 15, 2011). Typically developing children have an enormous capacity for developing more than one language. As a trilingual SLP and a mom of four trilingual kids (English, Hebrew, and Yiddish), I often find ... Inbox
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Bilingualism
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Bilingualism
The ASHA Leader, June 2011, Vol. 16, 37. doi:10.1044/leader.IN6.16062011.37
The ASHA Leader, June 2011, Vol. 16, 37. doi:10.1044/leader.IN6.16062011.37
I was thrilled to see Deborah Chitester’s comments on bilingualism (“First Person on the Last Page,” March 15, 2011). Typically developing children have an enormous capacity for developing more than one language. As a trilingual SLP and a mom of four trilingual kids (English, Hebrew, and Yiddish), I often find myself fighting an uphill battle with my colleagues! Children with language delay can, and sometimes should, learn more than one language. However, I find that SLPs are encouraging parents to “ease up” on the child—with later regrets. Does cultural bias skew our decision-making? Or do we think that learning more than one language is too hard for a child with language delays? Let’s make sure our professionalism is at work when treating and guiding bilingual children and their families.
Malkie Rosen Beitar Illit, Israel
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June 2011
Volume 16, Issue 6