First Person on the Last Page: Finding My Path I always wanted to work with children in the schools. Prior to discovering speech-language pathology, I believed I would be a teacher. From a young age I collected books, toys, and games in hopes of one day using them with students in my classroom. As a freshman majoring in biology ... First Person on the Last Page
Free
First Person on the Last Page  |   February 01, 2011
First Person on the Last Page: Finding My Path
Author Notes
  • Amanda Krigsman, MA, CF-SLP, works with students with multiple disabilities in Queens, N.Y., as part of the New York City Department of Education. Contact her at amandakrigsman@yahoo.com.
    Amanda Krigsman, MA, CF-SLP, works with students with multiple disabilities in Queens, N.Y., as part of the New York City Department of Education. Contact her at amandakrigsman@yahoo.com.×
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Professional Issues & Training / First Person on the Last Page
First Person on the Last Page   |   February 01, 2011
First Person on the Last Page: Finding My Path
The ASHA Leader, February 2011, Vol. 16, 39. doi:10.1044/leader.FPLP.16022011.39
The ASHA Leader, February 2011, Vol. 16, 39. doi:10.1044/leader.FPLP.16022011.39

Graphic Jump LocationImage Not Available

I always wanted to work with children in the schools. Prior to discovering speech-language pathology, I believed I would be a teacher. From a young age I collected books, toys, and games in hopes of one day using them with students in my classroom.
As a freshman majoring in biology and secondary education at the State University of New York/ Geneseo, I had the opportunity to observe middle-school classrooms in New York City public schools and discovered that students were disrespectful to the teachers. Class sizes were large and there was little time to work with students individually. I concluded that teaching was not the right field for me, as I wanted to work closely with students and get to know their strengths and weaknesses.
I spent a great deal of time wondering, “Now what?” Luckily I took an introductory class in communication sciences and disorders and fell in love with speech-language pathology. In what other profession can one work with any population and age group? SLPs usually work in an environment that would enable me to focus on meeting each student’s unique goals. I could fulfill my dream of working in a school setting while helping children improve their ability to communicate!
In May 2010, I graduated with my master’s degree from Queens College in Flushing, N.Y. After devoting the past six years to coursework and externship placements, it seemed appropriate for the theme of my graduation party to be “speech and language.” I created signs in phonetics and tabletop centerpieces related to the anatomy and physiology of the speech mechanism. I displayed charts for phoneme acquisition and developmental milestones, hung “speech bananas” in the backyard, and made chocolate lips. My fellow graduates even brought The ASHA Leader to the party!
Thinking ahead, a few years ago I began creating a materials closet for the toys and games I’ve collected throughout my life. I enjoy checking out garage sales and discount stores for new items. I look for games, books, and toys that can be easily adapted and used for children of different ages with various communication disorders. I recently started my first job as an SLP working with middle-school students with multiple disabilities. Although many students are unable to play games according to the instructions, I’ve been able to adapt games and other materials to meet their communication goals. My professional journey has taken a different path than envisioned, but I am finally able to use my collection of toys, books, and games in my materials closet with my students.
0 Comments
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment
Name
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account ×
FROM THIS ISSUE
February 2011
Volume 16, Issue 2