ASHA Objects to Certification Application ASHA has objected to an application by the American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities (AAAASF) to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for “deeming” status. With “deeming” status, private national accreditation organizations may perform accreditation surveys to determine if providers adhere to the accrediting organization’s standards, ... ASHA News
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ASHA News  |   February 01, 2011
ASHA Objects to Certification Application
Author Notes
  • Mark Kander, director of health care regulatory analysis, can be reached at mkander@asha.org.
    Mark Kander, director of health care regulatory analysis, can be reached at mkander@asha.org.×
Article Information
ASHA News & Member Stories / ASHA News
ASHA News   |   February 01, 2011
ASHA Objects to Certification Application
The ASHA Leader, February 2011, Vol. 16, 17. doi:10.1044/leader.AN3.16022011.17
The ASHA Leader, February 2011, Vol. 16, 17. doi:10.1044/leader.AN3.16022011.17
ASHA has objected to an application by the American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities (AAAASF) to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for “deeming” status.
With “deeming” status, private national accreditation organizations may perform accreditation surveys to determine if providers adhere to the accrediting organization’s standards, which must meet or exceed Medicare criteria. A provider who receives the accreditation may be reimbursed for services provided to Medicare beneficiaries.
If the status is granted, AAAASF could accredit a rehabilitation agency or public health agency (as a provider of speech-language pathology services), which then would be allowed to participate in the Medicare program. The accreditation program does not apply to individual or group private practices.
ASHA submitted comments to CMS recommending that the application not be accepted. The comments outline several concerns about the organization:
  • It lacks adequate familiarity with speech-language pathology and physical therapy services, and has had no discussion with ASHA on quality of care for patients receiving speech-language pathology services.

  • Although AAAASF may have experience with speech- and hearing-related surgical procedures such as tracheostomies and cochlear implants, follow-up rehabilitation is not commonly rendered at such surgical facilities.

  • The group’s official standards are exactly the same (verbatim) as the Medicare Conditions of Participation; if an accrediting organization’s goal is to maintain high standards of health care delivery, ASHA believes the organization should develop quality standards that are more stringent than those of basic participation, or should have requirements that reflect measures that would eliminate the need for a therapy cap.

  • The group has indicated that future accreditation surveys will be conducted by staff from accredited facilities. ASHA believes that rehabilitation agency surveyors should be experts in the rehabilitation discipline under review rather than staff from organizations that have successfully completed an AAAASF accreditation survey.

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February 2011
Volume 16, Issue 2