Our Professional Names I was dismayed to see a recent ABC television news report about the upcoming film “The King’s Speech.” One person interviewed was identified as a “speech therapist.” This inaccurate use of a title calls into question professional credentials. Sadly, the report did not reference ASHA. I agree with Dr. Robinson ... Inbox
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Inbox  |   January 01, 2011
Our Professional Names
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Professional Issues & Training / ASHA News & Member Stories / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Inbox
Inbox   |   January 01, 2011
Our Professional Names
The ASHA Leader, January 2011, Vol. 16, 2-38. doi:10.1044/leader.IN2.16012011.2
The ASHA Leader, January 2011, Vol. 16, 2-38. doi:10.1044/leader.IN2.16012011.2
I was dismayed to see a recent ABC television news report about the upcoming film “The King’s Speech.” One person interviewed was identified as a “speech therapist.” This inaccurate use of a title calls into question professional credentials. Sadly, the report did not reference ASHA.
I agree with Dr. Robinson that we should take pride in our professional name and insist on its use. When we allow “language” to be dropped, we are helping to continue the misconception that we work only with articulation.
I began working in the United States before reciprocity agreements about certification. I “redid” my master’s degree to earn my CCCs and become a member of ASHA. I have worked too long and hard in this profession to answer to anything other than speech-language pathologist.
Linda Hollingsworth, River Bend, Missouri
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January 2011
Volume 16, Issue 1