Decibels in the Desert Nearly 300 audiologists and other hearing conservation professionals met in Tucson on Feb. 24–26 for “Decibels in the Desert,” the 30th annual Hearing Conservation Conference of the National Hearing Conservation Association (NHCA). “Unlike many audiology, acoustical, or medical conferences, the NHCA conference is focused exclusively on preventing hearing loss,” commented ... ASHA News
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ASHA News  |   May 01, 2005
Decibels in the Desert
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Hearing Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / ASHA News
ASHA News   |   May 01, 2005
Decibels in the Desert
The ASHA Leader, May 2005, Vol. 10, 5-26. doi:10.1044/leader.AN2.10072005.5
The ASHA Leader, May 2005, Vol. 10, 5-26. doi:10.1044/leader.AN2.10072005.5
Nearly 300 audiologists and other hearing conservation professionals met in Tucson on Feb. 24–26 for “Decibels in the Desert,” the 30th annual Hearing Conservation Conference of the National Hearing Conservation Association (NHCA).
“Unlike many audiology, acoustical, or medical conferences, the NHCA conference is focused exclusively on preventing hearing loss,” commented outgoing NHCA President, Ted Madison. “With three full days of workshops, lectures, discussions, and posters on noise exposure and hearing loss prevention, the NHCA conference provides a unique opportunity for professionals from a wide variety of disciplines to come together and share information,” Madison added. Attendees received a broad spectrum of information, from practical tools and ideas for improving the day-to-day practice of hearing conservation to the latest research on noise exposure, cochlear pathology, and hearing health education.
The keynote presentation, “Otoacoustic Emissions (OAEs) and Noise Induced Hearing Loss,” was delivered by Martin S. Robinette, professor of audiology at the Mayo College of Medicine in Scottsdale, AZ. He clearly described the benefits and limitations of using OAE data to identify cochlear damage due to noise and to predict noise-induced hearing loss.
Jo-Anne Bachorowski, associate professor of psychology at Vanderbilt University, reminded attendees of the importance of non-linguistic aspects of vocalized speech with her luncheon presentation on the acoustics of laughter.
The honor of delivering the 2005 Gasaway Lecture fell to former NHCA President Jim Banach. He challenged the audience with his presentation, “Meet Them Where They’re At…But Where Are You?” to take time to understand the personal motivators that may influence noise-exposed persons to adopt hearing-healthy behaviors and attitudes. His message was well received, as the conference participants voted to award Banach the 2005 Outstanding Lecture Award.
Three graduate students in audiology received 2005 NHCA Student Conference Awards: Elizabeth Beal from Central Michigan University, Dana Libman from the University of South Florida, and Rachel Sanders from the University of Northern Colorado. These awards, which may be used to help defray the cost of attending the NHCA conference, are available to students who are actively pursuing a degree in a discipline related to hearing conservation and who are enrolled at least half-time in an accredited educational institution.
In addition to the educational activities, conference participants were able to network, socialize, and enjoy the natural beauty of Tucson in late winter. The first annual NHCA Golf Tournament, which preceded the conference, brought winter-weary golfers out into the warm sunshine to raise nearly $3,000 for the NHCA Scholarship Foundation.
In 2006, the 31st annual NHCA Hearing Conservation Conference will be held in Tampa, FL on Feb. 16–18. For more information, visit NHCA online or call the NHCA office at 303-224-9022.
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May 2005
Volume 10, Issue 7