Audiology in Brief The Marine Corps Times reports that “tactical earplugs” may soon be added to the list of mandatory utility uniform items, in an attempt to reduce hearing loss caused by roadside bombs and other ordnance. These earplugs, already in use by the Army, are more advanced than the foam or ... News in Brief
Free
News in Brief  |   July 01, 2005
Audiology in Brief
Author Notes
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / News in Brief
News in Brief   |   July 01, 2005
Audiology in Brief
The ASHA Leader, July 2005, Vol. 10, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.10092005.5
The ASHA Leader, July 2005, Vol. 10, 5. doi:10.1044/leader.NIB.10092005.5
Earplugs May Become Mandatory For Marines In Iraq
The Marine Corps Times reports that “tactical earplugs” may soon be added to the list of mandatory utility uniform items, in an attempt to reduce hearing loss caused by roadside bombs and other ordnance. These earplugs, already in use by the Army, are more advanced than the foam or plastic earplugs Marines now use. Called “Combat Arms and AOSafety Indoor/Outdoor Range” plugs, the earplugs allow users to hear normally until a loud noise occurs and triggers a pressure-activated valve in the plug which blocks sound and protects the soldier’s ear. The two-ended plastic plugs can also be reversed to offer continuous protection against ongoing noise. Marines are already required to have some type of earplugs, but the change would require them to carry the tactical plugs at all times.
Essential Oils and Otitis Media
Applying certain essential oils to the ear canal appears to be an effective treatment for acute otitis media (AOM), according to a recent animal study at Landspitali University Hostpial in Reykjavik, Iceland. Vapors released by essential oils, such as oil of basil, have produced rapid bactericidal effects. Topical therapy for AOM is usually not recommended because most antimicrobial agents are in a liquid form that cannot penetrate the tympanic membrane to reach the infected middle ear. Essential oil vapors, however, may be able to diffuse into the middle ear. The Icelandic team tested oil of basil, essential oil components including thymol, carvacrol, and salicylaldehyde, and placebo on rats with experimental AOM due to Staphylococcus pneumoniae or Haemophilius influenzae. Treatment cured or healed 56% to 81% of rats with H. influenzae AOM and 6% to 75% of rats with pneumococcal AOM. Placebo cure rates did not exceed 6%.
Squealing Pigs A Noise Hazard
So much for the peace and quiet of rural life-at least for farmers working without hearing protection. A study by Kansas State University researchers suggests that farmers have greater hearing loss than people who work in other fields. A recent screening of more than 300 New York farmers found 77% had hearing loss. Researchers have found that on the farm, exposure to engine noise, loud animals or power tool motors can damage hearing in about two hours unless some type of hearing protection is used. An Iowa report cites the same dangers. Iowa Farmer Today listed the high noise levels of tractors (74–112 decibels), combine harvesters (80–115 decibels); and even pigs-particularly sows in gestation, which squeal at between 85 and 115 decibels.
0 Comments
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment
Name
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account ×
FROM THIS ISSUE
July 2005
Volume 10, Issue 9